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gore1

[gawr, gohr] /gɔr, goʊr/
noun
1.
blood that is shed, especially when clotted.
2.
murder, bloodshed, violence, etc.:
That horror movie had too much gore.
Origin
900
before 900; Middle English; Old English gor dung, dirt; cognate with Dutch goor, Old High German gor filth

gore2

[gawr, gohr] /gɔr, goʊr/
verb (used with object), gored, goring.
1.
to pierce with or as if with a horn or tusk.
Origin
1350-1400; Middle English goren; see gore3

gore3

[gawr, gohr] /gɔr, goʊr/
noun
1.
a triangular piece of material inserted in a garment, sail, etc., to give it greater width or a desired shape.
Compare godet (def 1), gusset (def 1).
2.
one of the panels, usually tapering or shaped, making up a garment, as a skirt.
3.
a triangular tract of land, especially one lying between larger divisions.
verb (used with object), gored, goring.
4.
to make or furnish with a gore or gores.
Origin
before 900; Middle English; Old English gāra corner (cognate with German Gehre gusset); compare Old English gār spear

Gore

[gawr, gohr] /gɔr, goʊr/
noun
1.
Albert Arnold, Jr ("Al") born 1948, U.S. politician: vice president of the U.S. 1993–2001.

Gore

[gawr-ey, gohr-ey] /ˈgɔr eɪ, ˈgoʊr eɪ/
noun
1.
a city in W Ethiopia.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for gore
  • Various vultures have featherless necks, presumably to stop the blood and gore from their meals matting their plumage.
  • Instead of the old, stiff gore wind stopper material, this is light and flexible.
  • Game makers, however, seem to thumb their noses and amp up the virtual gore.
  • Of course, there's a lot of technology behind all that gore.
  • Many visitors were overwhelmed horrific gore, and the thousands dead or dying.
  • The stepped up censorship tends to focus more on blood and gore than people beating each other up.
  • The audience will become surfeited with gore, with bad stories.
  • gore's committees also set up the auctions of underused radio spectra to allow for the growth of cell phone bandwidth.
British Dictionary definitions for gore

gore1

/ɡɔː/
noun
1.
blood shed from a wound, esp when coagulated
2.
(informal) killing, fighting, etc
Word Origin
Old English gor dirt; related to Old Norse gor half-digested food, Middle Low German göre, Dutch goor

gore2

/ɡɔː/
verb
1.
(transitive) (of an animal, such as a bull) to pierce or stab (a person or another animal) with a horn or tusk
Word Origin
C16: probably from Old English gār spear

gore3

/ɡɔː/
noun
1.
a tapering or triangular piece of material used in making a shaped skirt, umbrella, etc
2.
a similarly shaped piece, esp of land
verb
3.
(transitive) to make into or with a gore or gores
Derived Forms
gored, adjective
Word Origin
Old English gāra; related to Old Norse geiri gore, Old High German gēro

Gore

/ɡɔː/
noun
1.
Al(bert) Jr. born 1948, US Democrat politician; vice president of the US (1993–2001); defeated in the disputed presidential election of 2000; leading environmental campaigner; shared the 2007 Nobel Peace Prize with the Intergovernmental Panel For Climate Change
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for gore
n.

Old English gor "dirt, dung, filth, shit," a Germanic word (cf. Middle Dutch goor "filth, mud;" Old Norse gor "cud;" Old High German gor "animal dung"), of uncertain origin. Sense of "clotted blood" (especially shed in battle) developed by 1560s.

"triangular piece of ground," Old English gara, related to gar "spear" (see gar), on the notion of "triangularity." Hence also meanings "front of a skirt" (mid-13c.), and "triangular piece of cloth" (early 14c.).

v.

c.1400, from Scottish gorren "to pierce, stab," origin unknown, perhaps related to Old English gar "spear" (see gar, also gore (n.2) "triangular piece of ground"). Related: Gored; goring.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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