V, v

[vee]
noun, plural V's or Vs, v's or vs.
1.
the 22nd letter of the English alphabet, a consonant.
2.
any spoken sound represented by the letter V or v, as in victor, flivver, or shove.
3.
something having the form of a V .
4.
a written or printed representation of the letter V or v.
5.
a device, as a printer's type, for reproducing the letter V or v.
Dictionary.com Unabridged

V

2.
Mathematics, vector.
4.
6.
Electricity. volt; volts.

V

Symbol.
1.
the 22nd in order or in a series, or, when I is omitted, the 21st.
2.
(sometimes lowercase) the Roman numeral for five. Compare Roman numerals.
3.
Chemistry, vanadium.
4.
Biochemistry, valine.
5.
Physics. electric potential.
6.
(especially during World War II) the symbol of Allied victory.

v

5.
Electricity. volt; volts.

V.

1

Origin:
< Latin vidē

V.

2
3.
7.
9.
11.
12.
14.
15.
visual acuity.
17.

v.

1

Origin:
< Latin vidē

v.

2
2.
(in personal names) van.
4.
6.
10.
11.
12.
13.
15.
16.
18.
19.
21.
22.
(in personal names) von.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Collins
World English Dictionary
v or V (viː)
 
n , pl v's, V's, Vs
1.  the 22nd letter and 17th consonant of the modern English alphabet
2.  a speech sound represented by this letter, in English usually a voiced labio-dental fricative, as in vote
3.  a.  something shaped like a V
 b.  See also V-sign (in combination): a V neck
 
V or V
 
n

v
 
symbol for
1.  physics velocity
2.  specific volume (of a gas)

V
 
symbol for
1.  (in transformational grammar) verb
2.  volume (capacity)
3.  volt
4.  chem vanadium
5.  luminous efficiency
6.  victory
7.  Roman numeral See Roman numerals five
 
abbreviation for
8.  Vatican City (international car registration)

v.
 
abbreviation for
1.  verb
2.  verse
3.  version
4.  verso
5.  (usually italic) versus
6.  very
7.  vide
8.  vocative
9.  volume
10.  von

V.
 
abbreviation for
1.  Venerable
2.  (in titles) Very
3.  (in titles) Vice
4.  Viscount

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

V
In M.E., -u- and -v- were used interchangeably, though with a preference for v- as the initial letter (vnder, vain, etc.) and -u- elsewhere (full, euer, etc.). The distinction into consonant and vowel identities was established in Eng. by 1630, under influence of continental printers, but into 19c. some
dictionaries and other catalogues continued to list -u- and -v- words as a single series. No native Anglo-Saxon words begin in v- except those (vane, vat, vixen) altered by the southwestern England habit of replacing initial f- with v- (and initial s- with z-). Confusion of -v- and -w- was also a characteristic of 16c. Cockney accents. In Ger. rocket weapons systems of WWII, it stood for Vergeltungswaffe "reprisal weapon." V-eight as a type of motor engine is recorded from 1930 (V-engine is attested from 1924), so called for the arrangement. The V for "victory" hand sign was conceived Jan. 1941 by Belgian politician and resistance leader Victor de Laveleye, to signify Fr. victoire and Flem. vrijheid ("freedom"). It was broadcast into Europe by Radio België/Radio Belgique and popularized by the BBC by June 1941, from which time it became a universal allied gesture.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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American Heritage
Medical Dictionary

v abbr.
venous blood (used as a subscript)

V
The symbol for the element vanadium.

V

Abbr. volt

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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American Heritage
Science Dictionary
V  
  1. The symbol for vanadium.

  2. The symbol for voltage.

  3. Abbreviation of volume


vanadium   (və-nā'dē-əm)  Pronunciation Key 
Symbol V
A soft, bright-white metallic element that occurs naturally in several minerals. It has good structural strength and is used especially to make strong varieties of steel. Atomic number 23; atomic weight 50.942; melting point 1,890°C; boiling point 3,000°C; specific gravity 6.11; valence 2, 3, 4, 5. See Periodic Table.
The American Heritage® Science Dictionary
Copyright © 2002. Published by Houghton Mifflin. All rights reserved.
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FOLDOC
Computing Dictionary

V definition


Upper case V, ASCII character 86, known in INTERCAL as book.
1. A testbed for distributed system research.
2. Wide-spectrum language used in the knowledge-based environment CHI. "Research on Knowledge-Based Software Environments at Kestrel Inst", D.R. Smith et al, IEEE Trans Soft Eng SE-11(11):1278-1295 (1985).

The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing, © Denis Howe 2010 http://foldoc.org
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American Heritage
Abbreviations & Acronyms
v.
  1. vocals

  2. voice

V
  1. 5

  2. potential

  3. vanadium

  4. Vatican City (international vehicle ID)

  5. velocity

  6. verb

  7. very

  8. victory

  9. violence (television rating)

  10. vocative

  11. volt

  12. volume

  13. vowel

v.
  1. verb

  2. verse

  3. version

  4. verso

  5. Latin versus (against)

  6. Latin vide (see)

  7. volume

V.
  1. venerable

  2. very

  3. viscount

  4. viscountess

The American Heritage® Abbreviations Dictionary, Third Edition
Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Company.
Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
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Example sentences for +V
There are clues that death is coming including the letter v in high dive.
The process, however, was a clear farce, and pius v renegated its acts.
One myth is that a v should be cut in the end of the ingrown nail this myth is
  untrue.
The origin of the connection is in the pyramidal neurons of layer v of the
  cortex.
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