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ambush

[am-boo sh] /ˈæm bʊʃ/
noun, Also, ambushment
1.
an act or instance of lying concealed so as to attack by surprise:
The highwaymen waited in ambush near the road.
2.
an act or instance of attacking unexpectedly from a concealed position.
3.
the concealed position itself:
They fired from ambush.
4.
those who attack suddenly and unexpectedly from a concealed position.
verb (used with object)
5.
to attack from ambush.
Origin
1250-1300
1250-1300; (v.) Middle English enbuss(h)en < Middle French embuschier to place men in ambush, literally, to set in the woods, equivalent to em- im-1 + busch- (< Vulgar Latin *busca wood, forest < Germanic *busk- heavy stick) + -ier infinitive suffix; (noun) earlier enbusshe < Middle French embusche, derivative of the v.
Related forms
ambusher, noun
ambushlike, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for ambush
  • Two policemen and two soldiers were shot dead in an ambush.
  • For instance, in creating new nesting places or new spots for predator ambush.
  • The idea that the thylacine was an ambush predator should spur us to reconsider the reasons for the predator's disappearance.
  • They use their impressive leap and sticky toes to climb up into the canopy at night to ambush their prey.
  • The same applies to any ambush predator same size or smaller than its prey.
  • So, by not doing it, it will be harder for someone to ambush me.
  • At which point, an ambush and a bullet seem plausible.
  • Mosasaurs, however, were slightly smaller and hunted by ambush.
  • Within days, the euro countries cantered into a new ambush.
  • But once a crow begins to dig, other crows form a circle around the digger, waiting in ambush.
British Dictionary definitions for ambush

ambush

/ˈæmbʊʃ/
noun
1.
the act of waiting in a concealed position in order to launch a surprise attack
2.
a surprise attack from such a position
3.
the concealed position from which such an attack is launched
4.
the person or persons waiting to launch such an attack
verb
5.
to lie in wait (for)
6.
(transitive) to attack suddenly from a concealed position
Derived Forms
ambusher, noun
Word Origin
C14: from Old French embuschier to position in ambush, from em-im- + -buschier, from busche piece of firewood, probably of Germanic origin; see bush1
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for ambush
v.

c.1300, from Old French embuscher (13c., Modern French embûcher) "to lay an ambush," from en- "in" + busch "wood," apparently from Frankish *busk "bush, woods" (see bush (n.)). Related: Ambushed; ambushing.

n.

late 15c., embushe, from the English verb or from Middle French embusche, from Old French embuscher (see ambush (v.)). Earlier was ambushment (late 14c.). Figurative use by 1590s.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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ambush in Technology

language
A language for linear programming problems in a materials processing and transportation network.
["AMBUSH - An Advanced Model Builder for Linear Programming", T.R. White et al, National Petroleum Refiners Assoc Comp Conf (Nov 1971)].
(1995-06-19)

The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing, © Denis Howe 2010 http://foldoc.org
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ambush in the Bible

Joshua at the capture of Ai lay in ambush, and so deceived the inhabitants that he gained an easy victory (Josh. 8:4-26). Shechem was taken in this manner (Judg. 9:30-45. Comp. Jer. 51:12).

Easton's 1897 Bible Dictionary
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