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broker

[broh-ker] /ˈbroʊ kər/
noun
1.
an agent who buys or sells for a principal on a commission basis without having title to the property.
2.
a person who functions as an intermediary between two or more parties in negotiating agreements, bargains, or the like.
verb (used with object)
4.
to act as a broker for:
to broker the sale of a house.
verb (used without object)
5.
to act as a broker.
Origin
1350-1400
1350-1400; Middle English broco(u)r < Anglo-French broco(u)r, abrocour middleman, wine merchant; compare Old Provençal abrocador, perhaps based on Spanish alboroque gift or drink concluding a transaction (< Arabic al-burūk the gift, gratuity), with -ador < Latin -ātōr- -ator
Related forms
brokership, noun
subbroker, noun

broke

[brohk] /broʊk/
verb
1.
a simple past tense of break.
2.
Nonstandard. a past participle of break.
3.
Archaic. a past participle of break.
adjective
4.
without money; penniless.
5.
noun
6.
Papermaking. paper unfit for sale; paper that is to be repulped.
7.
brokes, wool of poor quality taken from the neck and belly of sheep.
Idioms
8.
go broke,
  1. to become destitute of money or possessions.
  2. to go bankrupt:
    In that business people are forever going broke.
9.
go for broke, to exert oneself or employ one's resources to the utmost.
Origin
1655-65 (adj.); 1875-80 (noun)
Synonyms
4, 5. insolvent, destitute, impoverished.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for broker
  • OR go talk to a broker and ask hus opinion on market direction.
  • In a famous moment in the case the broker said economists did not have a good record for prediction.
  • But technology has become a mainstay alongside the traditional marriage broker.
  • The secret to success is all about being an effective conduit, or broker.
  • We could talk to friends and families with a telephone and get stock prices by calling a broker before e-mail was invented.
  • Your mortgage broker should have told you everything that you needed for the closing.
  • The broker role must be naturally fulfilled flawlessly.
  • It can act as a broker between the rich world and the emerging world.
  • It also tracks and publishes the history of every loan it helps broker.
  • If your mortgage broker isn't in the ballpark, then you should get a new one.
British Dictionary definitions for broker

broker

/ˈbrəʊkə/
noun
1.
an agent who, acting on behalf of a principal, buys or sells goods, securities, etc, in return for a commission: insurance broker
2.
(formerly) short for stockbroker
3.
a dealer in second-hand goods
verb
4.
to act as a broker (in)
Word Origin
C14: from Anglo-French brocour broacher (of casks, hence, one who sells, agent), from Old Northern French broquier to tap a cask, from broque tap of a cask; see broach1

broke

/brəʊk/
verb
1.
the past tense of break
adjective
2.
(informal) having no money; bankrupt
3.
(slang) go for broke, to risk everything in a gambling or other venture
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for broker
n.

late 14c., from Anglo-French brocour "small trader," from abrokur "retailer of wine, tapster;" perhaps from Portuguese alborcar "barter," but more likely from Old French brocheor, from brochier "to broach, tap, pierce (a keg)," from broche "pointed tool" (see broach (n.)), giving original sense of "wine dealer," hence "retailer, middleman, agent." In Middle English, used contemptuously of peddlers and pimps.

v.

1630s (implied in brokering), from broker (n.). Related: Brokered.

broke

adj.

past tense and obsolete past participle of break (v.); extension to "insolvent" is first recorded 1716 (broken in this sense is attested from 1590s). Old English cognate broc meant, in addition to "that which breaks," "affliction, misery."

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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broker in Culture

broker definition


A financial agent or intermediary; a middleman.

The American Heritage® New Dictionary of Cultural Literacy, Third Edition
Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Company.
Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
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Slang definitions & phrases for broker

broke

adjective

Entirely out of money; destitute (1660s+)

Related Terms

all hell broke loose, dead broke, flat broke, go broke, go for broke


The Dictionary of American Slang, Fourth Edition by Barbara Ann Kipfer, PhD. and Robert L. Chapman, Ph.D.
Copyright (C) 2007 by HarperCollins Publishers.
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broker in Technology
The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing, © Denis Howe 2010 http://foldoc.org
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Idioms and Phrases with broker
The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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