follow Dictionary.com

Submit your word to be a Word of the Day!

creation

[kree-ey-shuh n] /kriˈeɪ ʃən/
noun
1.
the act of producing or causing to exist; the act of creating; engendering.
2.
the fact of being created.
3.
something that is or has been created.
4.
the Creation, the original bringing into existence of the universe by God.
5.
the world; universe.
6.
creatures collectively.
7.
an original product of the mind, especially an imaginative artistic work:
the creations of a poetic genius.
8.
a specially designed dress, hat, or other article of women's clothing, usually distinguished by imaginative or unique styling:
the newest Paris creations.
Origin
1350-1400
1350-1400; Middle English creacioun < Latin creātiōn- (stem of creātiō). See create, -ion
Related forms
creational, creationary
[kree-ey-shuh-ner-ee] /kriˈeɪ ʃəˌnɛr i/ (Show IPA),
adjective
anticreation, adjective
anticreational, adjective
precreation, noun
self-creation, noun
Synonyms
1. production, development, formation.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
Cite This Source
Examples from the web for creation
  • He cannot be excluded from any location or object in creation.
  • The rosary symbolizes the substances used in the progress of creation.
British Dictionary definitions for creation

creation

/kriːˈeɪʃən/
noun
1.
the act or process of creating
2.
the fact of being created or produced
3.
something that has been brought into existence or created, esp a product of human intelligence or imagination
4.
the whole universe, including the world and all the things in it
5.
an unusual or striking garment or hat
Derived Forms
creational, adjective

Creation

/kriːˈeɪʃən/
noun (theol)
1.
the Creation, God's act of bringing the universe into being
2.
the universe as thus brought into being by God
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
Cite This Source
Word Origin and History for creation
n.

late 14c., "action of creating, a created thing," from Old French creacion (14c., Modern French création) "creation, coming into being," from Latin creationem (nominative creatio) "a creating, a producing," in classical use "an electing, appointment, choice," noun of action from past participle stem of creare (see create). Meaning "that which God has created, the world and all in it" is from 1610s. The native word in the Biblical sense was Old English frum-sceaft. Of fashion costumes, desserts, etc., from 1870s, from French. Creation science is attested by 1970.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
Cite This Source
creation in Culture

Creation definition


God's creation of the world as described in the Book of Genesis, commencing in this way: “In the beginning God created the heavens and the Earth. And the Earth was without form, and void; and darkness was upon the face of the deep. And the Spirit of God moved upon the face of the waters. And God said, ‘Let there be light’: and there was light.” According to this account, the Creation took six days, with God creating Adam and Eve on the sixth day and resting on the seventh day. Genesis also gives another account of the Creation, in which God makes Adam out of clay, prepares the Garden of Eden for him, and then fashions Eve out of Adam's rib.

The American Heritage® New Dictionary of Cultural Literacy, Third Edition
Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Company.
Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
Cite This Source
creation in the Bible

"In the beginning" God created, i.e., called into being, all things out of nothing. This creative act on the part of God was absolutely free, and for infinitely wise reasons. The cause of all things exists only in the will of God. The work of creation is attributed (1) to the Godhead (Gen. 1:1, 26); (2) to the Father (1 Cor. 8:6); (3) to the Son (John 1:3; Col. 1:16, 17); (4) to the Holy Spirit (Gen. 1:2; Job 26:13; Ps. 104:30). The fact that he is the Creator distinguishes Jehovah as the true God (Isa. 37:16; 40:12, 13; 54:5; Ps. 96:5; Jer. 10:11, 12). The one great end in the work of creation is the manifestation of the glory of the Creator (Col. 1:16; Rev. 4:11; Rom. 11:36). God's works, equally with God's word, are a revelation from him; and between the teachings of the one and those of the other, when rightly understood, there can be no contradiction. Traditions of the creation, disfigured by corruptions, are found among the records of ancient Eastern nations. (See ACCAD.) A peculiar interest belongs to the traditions of the Accadians, the primitive inhabitants of the plains of Lower Mesopotamia. These within the last few years have been brought to light in the tablets and cylinders which have been rescued from the long-buried palaces and temples of Assyria. They bear a remarkable resemblance to the record of Genesis.

Easton's 1897 Bible Dictionary
Cite This Source

Word of the Day

Difficulty index for creation

Most English speakers likely know this word

Word Value for creation

10
12
Scrabble Words With Friends

Quotes with creation

Nearby words for creation