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discommode

[dis-kuh-mohd] /ˌdɪs kəˈmoʊd/
verb (used with object), discommoded, discommoding.
1.
to cause inconvenience to; disturb, trouble, or bother.
Origin of discommode
1715-1725
1715-25; < French discommoder, equivalent to dis- dis-1 + -commoder, verbal derivative of commode convenient; see commode
Related forms
discommodious, adjective
discommodiously, adverb
discommodiousness, noun
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2015.
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Examples from the Web for discommode
Historical Examples
  • An air of breathlessness about Rachel seemed to discommode her friends.

    Erik Dorn Ben Hecht
  • To ask for a guarantor for a reputable resident is simply to discommode two people instead of one.

    A Library Primer John Cotton Dana
  • "Yet not so far aside as to discommode any one," responded Mason.

  • The boys shouted to their animals, who flew across the plain as though the snow did not discommode them in the least.

    The Young Ranchers Edward S. Ellis
  • For this end it was necessary to discommode myself of my cloak, and of the volume which I carried in the pocket of my cloak.

    Edgar Huntley Charles Brockden Brown
  • I objected, for I did not wish to discommode him in the least and told him a good bed could be fixed in the mess wagon.

British Dictionary definitions for discommode

discommode

/ˌdɪskəˈməʊd/
verb
1.
(transitive) to cause inconvenience or annoyance to; disturb
Derived Forms
discommodious, adjective
discommodiously, adverb
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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