discredit

[dis-kred-it]
verb (used with object)
1.
to injure the credit or reputation of; defame: an effort to discredit honest politicians.
2.
to show to be undeserving of trust or belief; destroy confidence in: Later research discredited earlier theories.
3.
to give no credence to; disbelieve: There was good reason to discredit the witness.
noun
4.
loss or lack of belief or confidence; disbelief; distrust: His theories met with general discredit.
5.
loss or lack of repute or esteem; disrepute.
6.
something that damages a good reputation: This behavior will be a discredit to your good name.

Origin:
1550–60; dis-1 + credit

undiscredited, adjective


1. disparage, disgrace, tarnish, undermine.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
discredit (dɪsˈkrɛdɪt)
 
vb
1.  to damage the reputation of
2.  to cause to be disbelieved or distrusted
3.  to reject as untrue or of questionable accuracy
 
n
4.  a person, thing, or state of affairs that causes disgrace
5.  damage to a reputation
6.  lack of belief or confidence

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

discredit
1550s, from dis- "opposite of" + credit. Related: Discredited.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
The army, in turn, says the killings are the work of communist guerrillas out
  to discredit it.
If one cannot understand fundamental thermodynamics, one has no business
  attempting to discredit this article.
Discredit the bachelor's degree as a job credential.
Obviously this post was written by some type of fascist trying to discredit
  legitimate objections.
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