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disruption

[dis-ruhp-shuh n] /dɪsˈrʌp ʃən/
noun
1.
forcible separation or division into parts.
2.
a disrupted condition:
The state was in disruption.
Origin
1640-1650
1640-50; < Latin disruptiōn- (stem of disruptiō), equivalent to disrupt- (see disrupt) + -iōn- -ion
Related forms
predisruption, noun
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples for disruption
  • The situation caused significant disruption at the airport.
  • What has changed is in the context of over two years of violence and disruption in.
  • But much work, such as the adjustments made to old software code, will merely buy protection from disruption.
  • Students will consider the factors that could contribute to the disruption of this balance.
  • The overarching challenge is to make that transition at minimum cost and without economic disruption.
  • Systems disruption is growing organically and it is still relatively new.
  • The outlook is good for people whose tracheal or bronchial disruption is due to other causes.
  • But every day, on thousands of campuses, millions of students are educated without any disruption by academic partisanship.
  • All the more reason, you might say, to fear the disruption a bid causes.
  • Researchers understand little about the link between ecological disruption and disease.
Word Origin and History for disruption
disruption
1640s, from L. disruptionem, from stem of disrumpere "break apart, split," from dis- "apart" (see dis-) + rumpere "to break" (see rupture).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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