disruption

[dis-ruhp-shuhn]
noun
1.
forcible separation or division into parts.
2.
a disrupted condition: The state was in disruption.

Origin:
1640–50; < Latin disruptiōn- (stem of disruptiō), equivalent to disrupt- (see disrupt) + -iōn- -ion

predisruption, noun
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World English Dictionary
disrupt (dɪsˈrʌpt)
 
vb
1.  (tr) to throw into turmoil or disorder
2.  (tr) to interrupt the progress of (a movement, meeting, etc)
3.  to break or split (something) apart
 
[C17: from Latin disruptus burst asunder, from dīrumpere to dash to pieces, from dis-1 + rumpere to burst]
 
dis'rupter
 
n
 
dis'ruptor
 
n
 
dis'ruption
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

disruption
1640s, from L. disruptionem, from stem of disrumpere "break apart, split," from dis- "apart" (see dis-) + rumpere "to break" (see rupture).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
The situation caused significant disruption at the airport.
What has changed is in the context of over two years of violence and disruption
  in.
But much work, such as the adjustments made to old software code, will merely
  buy protection from disruption.
Students will consider the factors that could contribute to the disruption of
  this balance.
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