dyslexia

[dis-lek-see-uh]
noun Pathology.
any of various reading disorders associated with impairment of the ability to interpret spatial relationships or to integrate auditory and visual information.

Origin:
1885–90; < Neo-Latin < Greek dys- dys- + léx(is) word + -ia -ia

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World English Dictionary
dyslexia (dɪsˈlɛksɪə)
 
n
Nontechnical name: word blindness a developmental disorder which can cause learning difficulty in one or more of the areas of reading, writing, and numeracy
 
[from dys- + -lexia from Greek lexis word]
 
usage  Rather than talking about a person being dyslexic or about dyslexics, it is better to talk about a person with dyslexia, people with dyslexia
 
dyslectic
 
adj, —n
 
dys'lexic
 
adj

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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

dyslexia
c.1887, from Ger. dyslex, from Gk. dys- "bad, abnormal, difficult" (see dys-) + lexis "word," from legein "speak" (see lecture). Dyslexic (n.) is first recorded 1961; dyslectic (adj.) from 1964.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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American Heritage
Medical Dictionary

dyslexia dys·lex·i·a (dĭs-lěk'sē-ə)
n.
A learning disorder marked by impairment of the ability to recognize and comprehend written words.


dys·lec'tic (-lěk'tĭk) n.
The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
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American Heritage
Science Dictionary
dyslexia   (dĭs-lěk'sē-ə)  Pronunciation Key 
A learning disability marked by impairment of the ability to recognize and comprehend written words.
The American Heritage® Science Dictionary
Copyright © 2002. Published by Houghton Mifflin. All rights reserved.
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American Heritage
Cultural Dictionary
dyslexia [(dis-lek-see-uh)]

Difficulty in reading when experienced by persons with normal vision and normal or above-normal intelligence. A common example of dyslexia is reading words with the letters in reverse order, as in fyl for fly.

The American Heritage® New Dictionary of Cultural Literacy, Third Edition
Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Company.
Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
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Example sentences
The fact that there is a text-to-speech function would be a great help for
  visually impaired readers, or those with dyslexia.
Dyslexia manifests itself as a difficulty with a highly unnatural activity:
  reading.
Dyslexia dysfunctions may explain some of the penchant for delay.
It's the leading software product for kids with dyslexia.
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