ensemble

[ahn-sahm-buhl, -sahmb; French ahn-sahn-bluh]
noun, plural ensembles [ahn-sahm-sahm-buhlz, -sahmbz; French ahn-sahn-bluh] .
1.
all the parts of a thing taken together, so that each part is considered only in relation to the whole.
2.
the entire costume of an individual, especially when all the parts are in harmony: She was wearing a beautiful ensemble by one of the French designers.
3.
a set of furniture.
4.
Music.
a.
the united performance of an entire group of singers, musicians, etc.
b.
the group so performing: a string ensemble.
5.
a group of supporting entertainers, as actors, dancers, and singers, in a theatrical production.

Origin:
1740–50; < French: together < Latin insimul, equivalent to in- in-2 + simul together; see simultaneous


1. totality, entirety, aggregate.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
ensemble (ɒnˈsɒmbəl, French ɑ̃sɑ̃blə)
 
n
1.  all the parts of something considered together and in relation to the whole
2.  a person's complete costume; outfit
3.  a.  the cast of a play other than the principals; supporting players
 b.  (as modifier): an ensemble role
4.  music
 a.  a group of soloists singing or playing together
 b.  (as modifier): an ensemble passage
5.  music the degree of precision and unity exhibited by a group of instrumentalists or singers performing together: the ensemble of the strings is good
6.  the general or total effect of something made up of individual parts
7.  physics
 a.  a set of systems (such as a set of collections of atoms) that are identical in all respects apart from the motions of their constituents
 b.  a single system (such as a collection of atoms) in which the properties are determined by the statistical behaviour of its constituents
 
adv
8.  all together or at once
 
adj
9.  (of a film or play) involving several separate but often interrelated story lines: ensemble comedy drama
10.  involving no individual star but several actors whose roles are of equal importance: fine ensemble playing
 
[C15: from French: together, from Latin insimul, from in-² + simul at the same time]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

ensemble
c.1440, from M.Fr. ensemblee "all the parts of a thing considered together," from L.L. insimul "at the same time," from in- intensive prefix + simul "at the same time." Musical sense first attested in Eng. 1844.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
Current membership in a professional chamber music ensemble is also beneficial.
It is more inward-looking, focused on themselves playing ever better music as
  an ensemble.
In order have a cohesive ensemble they must work together and these ideas are
  carried over into other areas of their lives.
Shoulder-length hair and patent leather party shoes complete the ensemble.
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