follow-up

[fol-oh-uhp]
noun
1.
the act of following up.
2.
an action or thing that serves to increase the effectiveness of a previous one, as a second or subsequent letter, phone call, or visit.
3.
Also called follow. Journalism.
a.
a news story providing additional information on a story or article previously published.
b.
Also called sidebar, supplementary story. a minor news story used to supplement a related story of major importance. Compare feature story ( def 1 ), human-interest story, shirttail.
adjective
4.
designed or serving to follow up, especially to increase the effectiveness of a previous action: a follow-up interview; a follow-up offer.
5.
of or pertaining to action that follows an initial treatment, course of study, etc.: follow-up care for mental patients; a follow-up survey.

Origin:
1920–25; noun, adj. use of verb phrase follow up

Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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FOLDOC
Computing Dictionary

followup definition


On Usenet, a posting generated in response to another posting (as opposed to a reply, which goes by e-mail rather than being broadcast). Followups include the ID of the parent message in their headers; smart news-readers can use this information to present Usenet news in "conversation" sequence rather than order-of-arrival. See thread.
[Jargon File]

The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing, © Denis Howe 2010 http://foldoc.org
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Example sentences
But the data can include false positives, requiring followup observations to confirm that the objects are actual planets.
Excellent summary, and the followup comments are great.
One of the big problems is that many people have little kids vaccinated, then forget about the followup shots.
The show's producers will followup with an outline for an episode, then viewers can create storyboards that direct the plot.
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