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furor

[fyoo r-awr, -er] /ˈfyʊər ɔr, -ər/
noun
1.
a general outburst of enthusiasm, excitement, controversy, or the like.
2.
a prevailing fad, mania, or craze.
3.
fury; rage; madness.
Also, especially British, furore (for defs 1, 2).
Origin
late Middle English
1425-1475
1425-75; < Latin: a raging; replacing late Middle English fureor < Middle French
Can be confused
furore, fury.
Synonyms
1, 3. frenzy, uproar, commotion, turmoil.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for furor
  • The furor over the demise of the scholarly monograph in the humanities comes from diverse academic quarters.
  • What if nationalistic furor grips the nation and drives it towards a belligerent nature.
  • Oblivious to the furor he had created, he was all angelic innocence.
  • He presented his ideas at conferences and invited seminars months before the media furor.
  • So of course a forum furor erupted about the announcement.
  • Accordingly, some of the furor over the fiasco has died down.
  • And then last year's furor about incarceration rates was a whole new level of silly.
  • If it were not for the huge public furor ongoing, and instead all were devoted to solving the problem, other options would appear.
  • He was obviously unprepared for the furor he unleashed.
  • In response to the furor, artists began to avoid forbidden images or conceal them under dotting, stippling and cross-hatches.
British Dictionary definitions for furor

furore

/fjʊˈrɔːrɪ/
noun
1.
a public outburst, esp of protest; uproar
2.
a sudden widespread enthusiasm for something; craze
3.
frenzy; rage; madness
Word Origin
C15: from Latin: frenzy, rage, from furere to rave
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for furor
n.

late 15c., from Middle French fureur, from Latin furor "a ravaging, rage, madness, passion;" related to furia "rage, passion, fury" (see fury).

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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8
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