follow Dictionary.com

Your favorite word could be our Word of the Day!

genie

[jee-nee] /ˈdʒi ni/
noun
1.
Islamic Mythology, jinn.
2.
a spirit, often appearing in human form, that when summoned by a person carries out the wishes of the summoner.
3.
any spirit; demon.
Origin
1645-1655
1645-55; < French génie < Latin genius; see genius
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
Cite This Source
Examples from the web for genie
  • Once you have infected adults in the air, the genie is out of the bottle.
  • He's worried about stuffing the punishment genie back in the bottle.
  • The pattern resembles squarish line drawings of fish or stylized genie lamps.
  • The technology genie is now out of the bottle and it is changing the way the next generation is interacting and shaping our world.
  • In one sense this debate is moot, because the crypto genie is out of the bottle.
  • He released a genie: in three terse papers, he founded the discipline known as sociobiology.
  • But the genie was out of the bottle: paper money had arrived.
  • It is difficult to image how a genie of your readers' discontent and disappointment can now be stuffed back into its lamp.
  • They stumble across a lamp and release a genie, who offers them each a wish.
  • The genie is out of the bottle and there is no stuffing it back in.
British Dictionary definitions for genie

genie

/ˈdʒiːnɪ/
noun
1.
(in fairy tales and stories) a servant who appears by magic and fulfils a person's wishes
2.
another word for jinni
Word Origin
C18: from French génie, from Arabic jinni demon, influenced by Latin genius attendant spirit; see genius

Genie

/ˈdʒiːnɪ/
noun
1.
(Canadian) an award given by the Academy of Canadian Cinema and Television in recognition of Canadian cinematic achievements
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
Cite This Source
Word Origin and History for genie
n.

1650s, "tutelary spirit," from French génie, from Latin genius (see genius); used in French translation of "Arabian Nights" to render Arabic jinni, singular of jinn, which it accidentally resembled, and attested in English with this sense from 1748.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
Cite This Source

Word of the Day

Difficulty index for genie

Many English speakers likely know this word

Word Value for genie

6
8
Scrabble Words With Friends