infield

[in-feeld]
noun
1.
Baseball.
a.
the diamond.
b.
the positions played by the first baseman, second baseman, third baseman, and shortstop, taken collectively.
c.
the infielders considered as a group (contrasted with outfield ).
2.
Track, Horse Racing. the area enclosed by a track.
3.
Agriculture.
a.
the part of the land of a farm nearest the farmhouse.
b.
land regularly tilled. Compare outfield ( def 3 ).

Origin:
1600–10; in-1 + field

Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Collins
World English Dictionary
infield (ˈɪnˌfiːld)
 
n
1.  cricket Compare outfield the area of the field near the pitch
2.  baseball
 a.  the area of the playing field enclosed by the base lines and extending beyond them towards the outfield
 b.  Compare outfield the positions of the first baseman, second baseman, shortstop, third baseman, and sometimes the pitcher, collectively
3.  agriculture
 a.  the part of a farm nearest to the farm buildings
 b.  land from which crops are regularly taken

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

infield
1733, "the land of a farm which lies nearest the homestead," from in + field. Baseball diamond sense first attested 1867.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
We have only had radio a century, so our signals have not even left the infield
  yet.
Then, as he enters the infield and climbs into an idling bulldozer, the
  children's chatter turns to squeals.
Plenty of tracks off on-site campgrounds, either in the infield or in the
  surrounding area.
Ideally, they can find a right-handed hitter to play the outfield or the
  infield corners.
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