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Denotation vs. Connotation

intimidate

[in-tim-i-deyt] /ɪnˈtɪm ɪˌdeɪt/
verb (used with object), intimidated, intimidating.
1.
to make timid; fill with fear.
2.
to overawe or cow, as through the force of personality or by superior display of wealth, talent, etc.
3.
to force into or deter from some action by inducing fear:
to intimidate a voter into staying away from the polls.
Origin of intimidate
1640-1650
1640-50; < Medieval Latin intimidātus, past participle of intimidāre to make afraid, equivalent to Latin in- in-2 + timid(us) timid, afraid + -ātus -ate1
Related forms
intimidation, noun
intimidator, noun
intimidatory
[in-tim-i-duh-tawr-ee, -tohr-ee] /ɪnˈtɪm ɪ dəˌtɔr i, -ˌtoʊr i/ (Show IPA),
adjective
unintimidated, adjective
unintimidating, adjective
Can be confused
intimate, intimidate.
Synonyms
1. frighten, subdue, daunt, terrify. See discourage.
Antonyms
1. calm. 3. encourage.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2015.
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Examples from the Web for intimidation
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • No constraint upon your free will is intended; no intimidation will be allowed within the limits of this army, at least.

    From Manassas to Appomattox James Longstreet
  • His intimidation had worked upon her conscience and driven her to the confessional.

    The Eternal City Hall Caine
  • The exercise of either spiritual or temporal power for purposes of intimidation or wrongful coercion was to him hateful.

    The Earl of Mayo William Wilson Hunter
  • Can you state any case where you enforced a false demand by intimidation?

    Davenport Dunn, Volume 2 (of 2) Charles James Lever
  • The issue turned squarely on the question of conspiring to injure others by coercion and intimidation.

British Dictionary definitions for intimidation

intimidate

/ɪnˈtɪmɪˌdeɪt/
verb (transitive)
1.
to make timid or frightened; scare
2.
to discourage, restrain, or silence illegally or unscrupulously, as by threats or blackmail
Derived Forms
intimidating, adjective
intimidation, noun
intimidator, noun
Word Origin
C17: from Medieval Latin intimidāre, from Latin in-² + timidus fearful, from timor fear
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for intimidation
n.

1650s, noun of action from intimidate; perhaps modeled on French intimidation.

intimidate

v.

1640s, from Medieval Latin intimidatus, past participle of intimidare "to frighten, intimidate," from Latin in- "in" (see in- (2)) + timidus "fearful" (see timid). Related: Intimidated; intimidating.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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