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[juhngk-cher] /ˈdʒʌŋk tʃər/
a point of time, especially one made critical or important by a concurrence of circumstances:
At this juncture, we must decide whether to stay or to walk out.
a serious state of affairs; crisis:
The matter has reached a juncture and a decision must be made.
the line or point at which two bodies are joined; joint or articulation; seam.
the act of joining.
the state of being joined.
something by which two things are joined.
  1. a pause or other phonological feature or modification of a feature, as the lengthening of a preceding phoneme or the strengthening of a following one, marking a transition or break between sounds, especially marking the phonological boundary of a word, clause, or sentence: it is present in such words as night-rate and re-seed and absent in such words as nitrate and recede.
  2. the point in a word or group of words at which such a pause or other junctural marker occurs.
Origin of juncture
1350-1400; Middle English < Latin junctūra, equivalent to junct(us) (see junction) + -ūra -ure
Can be confused
junction, juncture (see synonym study at junction)
1, 3. See junction. Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2015.
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Examples from the Web for juncture
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • Dinan returned at this juncture, and in reply to a question, ordered his employe to hitch up the white horse.

    The Crime of the Century Henry M. Hunt
  • Would it be wise to invade this home just at this juncture and introduce boarders?

    Ester Ried Yet Speaking Isabella Alden
  • At this juncture it will be necessary to glance at the state of affairs in Culhuacan.

  • At this juncture comes an interruption; Tracey Tanner returns, hot-foot.

    The Fortune Hunter Louis Joseph Vance
  • Just at this juncture, however, down came the rain with the violence that put all thoughts of slumber to flight.

    Typee Herman Melville
British Dictionary definitions for juncture


a point in time, esp a critical one (often in the phrase at this juncture)
  1. a pause in speech or a feature of pronunciation that introduces, accompanies, or replaces a pause
  2. the set of phonological features signalling a division between words, such as those that distinguish a name from an aim
a less common word for junction
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for juncture

late 14c., "place where two things are joined," from Latin iunctura "a joining, uniting, a joint," from iunctus, past participle of iungere "to join" (see jugular). Sense of "point in time" first recorded 1650s, probably from astrology.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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juncture in Medicine

juncture junc·ture (jŭngk'chər)
The point, line, or surface of union of two parts.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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Idioms and Phrases with juncture


The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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