merger

[mur-jer]
noun
1.
a statutory combination of two or more corporations by the transfer of the properties to one surviving corporation.
2.
any combination of two or more business enterprises into a single enterprise.
3.
an act or instance of merging.

Origin:
1720–30; merge + -er1

antimerger, adjective
demerger, noun
premerger, adjective
promerger, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Collins
World English Dictionary
merger (ˈmɜːdʒə)
 
n
1.  commerce Often called (Brit): amalgamation the combination of two or more companies, either by the creation of a new organization or by absorption by one of the others
2.  law the extinguishment of an estate, interest, contract, right, offence, etc, by its absorption into a greater one
3.  the act of merging or the state of being merged

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

merger
1889 in the business sense, from merge. Not common until c.1926
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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American Heritage
Cultural Dictionary

merger definition


The union of two or more independent corporations under a single ownership. Also known as takeovers, mergers may be friendly or hostile. In the latter case, the buying company, having met with resistance from directors of the targeted company, usually offers an inflated (overmarket) price to persuade stockholders of the targeted company to sell their shares to it. Such mergers often have been financed by junk bonds.

Note: Especially common in the 1980s, hostile takeovers have become highly controversial. Some contend that they bring needed infusions of capital and efficiency to the targeted company. Others argue that, having borrowed heavily to finance the merger, the buyer is forced to sell valuable assets of the targeted company to pay off its debt.
The American Heritage® New Dictionary of Cultural Literacy, Third Edition
Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Company.
Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
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Example sentences
Adding to the integration complexity is the fact that this combination is a true merger rather than a takeover situation.
The bank has risen to seventh in global merger advice.
The two groups say they will craft a merger proposal to be submitted to both
  boards of directors in the coming months.
But its focus is squarely on the post-trade aspects of any merger.
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