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nurture

[nur-cher] /ˈnɜr tʃər/
verb (used with object), nurtured, nurturing.
1.
to feed and protect:
to nurture one's offspring.
2.
to support and encourage, as during the period of training or development; foster:
to nurture promising musicians.
3.
to bring up; train; educate.
noun
4.
rearing, upbringing, training, education, or the like.
5.
development:
the nurture of young artists.
6.
something that nourishes; nourishment; food.
Origin
1300-1350
1300-50; (noun) Middle English norture < Middle French, variant of nourriture < Late Latin nūtrītūra a nourishing, equivalent to Latin nūtrīt(us) (past participle of nūtrīre to feed, nourish) + -ūra -ure; (v.) derivative of the noun
Related forms
nurturable, adjective
nurtureless, adjective
nurturer, noun
unnurtured, adjective
well-nurtured, adjective
Synonyms
1, 3. See nurse.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for nurture
  • If all goes well, the old arguments about the role of nature and nurture in human development may soon be seen in a new light.
  • We're offering new fiction and trying to nurture new writers.
  • Uranus does not nurture as the Moon should, it disrupts.
  • So again the answer to why a person has a certain characteristic can be both nature and nurture.
  • Every other sport understands you have to nurture your audience.
  • At both ends of the spectrum the clearer effects of nature and nurture are to be found.
  • This book will help your girl nurture her interests in science and technology.
  • We were brought up to listen, to nurture, to observe.
  • We exist to nurture the art of recorded music.
  • That's why it's critical to nurture and reward your employees.
British Dictionary definitions for nurture

nurture

/ˈnɜːtʃə/
noun
1.
the act or process of promoting the development, etc, of a child
2.
something that nourishes
3.
(biology) the environmental factors that partly determine the structure of an organism See also nature (sense 12)
verb (transitive)
4.
to feed or support
5.
to educate or train
Derived Forms
nurturable, adjective
nurturer, noun
Word Origin
C14: from Old French norriture, from Latin nutrīre to nourish
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for nurture
n.

c.1300, "breeding, upbringing," from Old French norture, nourreture "food, nourishment; education, training," from Late Latin nutritia (see nursery).

v.

"to feed or nourish," early 15c., from nurture (n.). Related: Nurtured; nurturing.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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