follow Dictionary.com

Do you know ghouls from goblins and ghosts?

polio

[poh-lee-oh] /ˈpoʊ liˌoʊ/
noun
Origin
1930-1935
1930-35, Americanism; shortened form
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
Cite This Source
Examples from the web for polio
  • They were essential to developing the polio vaccine.
  • They gave him stories from history and also solace during his long recovery from polio.
  • Still, polio scientists are eager to get a better picture of who these long-term shedders are.
  • The tantalizing dream of eradicating polio will have to be put off yet again.
  • For inspiration one need look no further than the current campaign against polio.
  • For another forty years polio would remain a substantial threat to public health.
  • Politics slow polio's eradication--and cause it to spread.
  • Lets not forget about the polio warning that the old vaccines are probably no longer effective due to several mutations.
  • Another popular theory has it that the virus was an unfortunate side effect of polio vaccine testing.
  • Nobody wants polio, so you're not trying to override the vaccine.
British Dictionary definitions for polio

polio

/ˈpəʊlɪəʊ/
noun
1.
short for poliomyelitis
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
Cite This Source
Word Origin and History for polio
n.

1911, abbreviation of poliomyelitis.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
Cite This Source
polio in Medicine

polio po·li·o (pō'lē-ō')
n.
Poliomyelitis.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
Cite This Source

Word of the Day

Word Value for polio

7
9
Scrabble Words With Friends

Quotes with polio