precondition

[pree-kuhn-dish-uhn]
noun
1.
something that must come before or is necessary to a subsequent result; condition: a precondition for a promotion.
verb (used with object)
2.
to subject (a person or thing) to a special treatment in preparation for a subsequent experience, process, test, etc.: to precondition a surface to receive paint.

Origin:
1910–15; pre- + condition

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World English Dictionary
precondition (ˌpriːkənˈdɪʃən)
 
n
1.  a necessary or required condition; prerequisite
 
vb
2.  (tr) psychol to present successively two stimuli to (an organism) without reinforcement so that they become associated; if a response is then conditioned to the second stimulus on its own, the same response will be evoked by the first stimulus

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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

precondition
1825, from pre- + condition (q.v.).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
Without that precondition, nothing else would happen.
The grants provide the precondition to jump start the manufacturing.
Variation is an essential precondition that makes evolution possible, but does
  not make it happen.
Across the country, graft was a precondition of doing business.
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