follow Dictionary.com

8 Wintry Words to Defrost Your Vocabulary

premonition

[pree-muh-nish-uh n, prem-uh-] /ˌpri məˈnɪʃ ən, ˌprɛm ə-/
noun
1.
a feeling of anticipation of or anxiety over a future event; presentiment:
He had a vague premonition of danger.
2.
a forewarning.
Origin
late Middle English
1425-1475
1425-75; late Middle English premunicioun (cf. praemunire) < Late Latin praemonitiōn- (stem of praemonitiō) forewarning. See pre-, monition
Synonyms
1. foreboding, portent, omen, sign.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
Cite This Source
Examples from the web for premonition
  • Ted cleared his throat, and it was just that: not a premonition of speech.
  • We can employ a similar back-of-the-envelope calculation to explain death premonition dreams.
  • My biggest fear as a young lad was a premonition.
  • There is no moon tonight, only the flicker of a gas flare far out in the sea, and the premonition of dawn.
  • That miner, he said, had a premonition that something bad was going to happen.
  • Over the weekend the family learned that his premonition had come true.
  • But before he could finish the thought, a premonition came.
  • There was no premonition of catastrophe.
  • My first premonition of trouble came before we took off.
  • Her son had called weeks before to say he had a premonition that he would be killed.
British Dictionary definitions for premonition

premonition

/ˌprɛməˈnɪʃən/
noun
1.
an intuition of a future, usually unwelcome, occurrence; foreboding
2.
an early warning of a future event; forewarning
Derived Forms
premonitory (prɪˈmɒnɪtərɪ; -trɪ) adjective
Word Origin
C16: from Late Latin praemonitiō, from Latin praemonēre to admonish beforehand, from prae before + monēre to warn, advise
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
Cite This Source
Word Origin and History for premonition
n.

mid-15c., from Anglo-French premunition, Middle French premonicion, from Late Latin praemonitionem (nominative praemonitio) "a forewarning," noun of action from past participle stem of Latin praemonere "forewarn," from prae "before" (see pre-) + monere "to warn" (see monitor (n.)).

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
Cite This Source

Word of the Day

Difficulty index for premonition

Some English speakers likely know this word

Word Value for premonition

15
19
Scrabble Words With Friends