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re-coil

[ree-koil] /riˈkɔɪl/
verb (used with object), verb (used without object)
1.
to coil again.
Origin
1860-1865
1860-65; re- + coil1
Can be confused
re-coil, recoil.

recoil

[v. ri-koil; n. ree-koil, ri-koil] /v. rɪˈkɔɪl; n. ˈriˌkɔɪl, rɪˈkɔɪl/
verb (used without object)
1.
to draw back; start or shrink back, as in alarm, horror, or disgust.
2.
to spring or fly back, as in consequence of force of impact or the force of the discharge, as a firearm.
3.
to spring or come back; react (usually followed by on or upon):
Plots frequently recoil upon the plotters.
4.
Physics. (of an atom, a nucleus, or a particle) to undergo a change in momentum as a result either of a collision with an atom, a nucleus, or a particle or of the emission of a particle.
noun
5.
an act of recoiling.
6.
the distance through which a weapon moves backward after discharging.
Origin
1175-1225; Middle English recoilen, reculen (v.) < Old French reculer, equivalent to re- re- + -culer, verbal derivative of cul rump, buttocks; see culet
Related forms
recoilingly, adverb
nonrecoil, noun
Can be confused
re-coil, recoil.
Synonyms
1. withdraw, quail, flinch, falter. See wince1 . 2. rebound.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for recoil
  • We rent movies about youths dying in mud or jungles and recoil at the senselessness of it all.
  • But while those countries recoil from atomic energy, others are committing to a nuclear future.
  • As it crouches, it stretches the tendons across its knee, which then recoil during the jump to give it an extra boost of power.
  • Rather than recoil from these new campers, the protesters did everything they could to include them in their tiny, model society.
  • Surely the public would recoil at the demonstrators' preference for confrontation over dialogue.
  • The brain may then instruct the robot to recoil from the object, depending on whether the object could damage the robot.
  • We are seeing a public recoil from formal politics, from the active, reasoned exercise of citizenship.
  • Rather than rely on a muzzle-brake to reduce recoil, use a rifle heavy enough to reduce recoil.
British Dictionary definitions for recoil

recoil

verb (intransitive) (rɪˈkɔɪl)
1.
to jerk back, as from an impact or violent thrust
2.
(often foll by from) to draw back in fear, horror, or disgust: to recoil from the sight of blood
3.
foll by on or upon. to go wrong, esp so as to hurt the perpetrator
4.
(of a nucleus, atom, molecule, or elementary particle) to change momentum as a result of the emission of a photon or particle
noun (rɪˈkɔɪl; ˈriːkɔɪl)
5.
  1. the backward movement of a gun when fired
  2. the distance moved
6.
the motion acquired by a particle as a result of its emission of a photon or other particle
7.
the act of recoiling
Derived Forms
recoiler, noun
Word Origin
C13: from Old French reculer, from re- + cul rump, from Latin cūlus
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for recoil
v.

early 13c. (transitive) "force back, drive back," from Old French reculer "to go back, give way, recede, retreat" (12c.), from Vulgar Latin *reculare, from Latin re- "back" (see re-) + culus "backside, bottom, fundament." Meaning "shrink back, retreat" is first recorded c.1300; and that of "spring back" (as a gun) in 1520s. Related: Recoiled; recoiling.

n.

c.1300, "retreat," from Old French recul "recoil, backward movement, retreat," from reculer (see recoil (v.)). Meaning "back-kick of a firearm" is from 1570s.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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