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renounce

[ri-nouns] /rɪˈnaʊns/
verb (used with object), renounced, renouncing.
1.
to give up or put aside voluntarily:
to renounce worldly pleasures.
2.
to give up by formal declaration:
to renounce a claim.
3.
to repudiate; disown:
to renounce one's son.
verb (used without object), renounced, renouncing.
4.
Cards.
  1. to play a card of a different suit from that led.
  2. to abandon or give up a suit led.
  3. to fail to follow the suit led.
noun
5.
Cards. an act or instance of renouncing.
Origin
1325-1375
1325-75; Middle English renouncen < Middle French renoncer < Latin renūntiāre to bring back word, disclaim, equivalent to re- re- + nūntiāre to announce, derivative of nūntius messenger, news
Related forms
renounceable, renunciable
[ruh-nuhn-see-uh-buh l, -shee-] /rəˈnʌn si ə bəl, -ʃi-/ (Show IPA),
adjective
renouncement, noun
renouncer, noun
nonrenouncing, adjective
self-renounced, adjective
self-renouncement, noun
self-renouncing, adjective
unrenounceable, adjective
unrenounced, adjective
unrenouncing, adjective
unrenunciable, adjective
Can be confused
denounce, renounce.
Synonyms
1. forsake, forgo, forswear, leave, quit. See abandon1 . 2. resign, abdicate. 3. disclaim, reject, disavow, deny.
Antonyms
1. claim. 3. accept.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for renounce
  • Part of playing the game right is to renounce the social impulse in favor of individual interests.
  • Even so, the government refused to renounce its claim, and the supposed treasure remains in dispute and unexcavated.
  • They have to have by-laws with clauses that renounce poaching and to adopt a technique they call conservation farming.
  • She's made an inner memo to renounce flirtations and any consequences that might result from them.
  • Yes, they need to renounce their counter-reality and come back to this one.
  • Some of them say they're getting ready to renounce their citizenship.
  • They're not going to renounce those policies without a struggle.
  • If that's not true, then he should renounce his affiliation.
  • Compared with citizenship of a country, membership is easy to acquire and renounce.
  • It's one thing to renounce a current leader, quite another to claim some rebels are a legitimate government.
British Dictionary definitions for renounce

renounce

/rɪˈnaʊns/
verb
1.
(transitive) to give up (a claim or right), esp by formal announcement: to renounce a title
2.
(transitive) to repudiate: to renounce Christianity
3.
(transitive) to give up (some habit, pursuit, etc) voluntarily: to renounce smoking
4.
(intransitive) (cards) to fail to follow suit because one has no cards of the suit led
noun
5.
(rare) a failure to follow suit in a card game
Derived Forms
renouncement, noun
renouncer, noun
Word Origin
C14: from Old French renoncer, from Latin renuntiāre to disclaim, from re- + nuntiāre to announce, from nuntius messenger
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for renounce
v.

late 14c., from Old French renoncier "give up, cede" (12c., Modern French renoncer), from Latin renuntiare "bring back word; proclaim; protest against, renounce," from re- "against" (see re-) + nuntiare "to report, announce," from nuntius "messenger" (see nuncio). Related: Renounced; renouncing.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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