scow

[skou]
noun
1.
any of various vessels having a flat-bottomed rectangular hull with sloping ends, built in various sizes with or without means of propulsion, as barges, punts, rowboats, or sailboats.
2.
Eastern U.S. a barge carrying bulk material in an open hold.
3.
an old or clumsy boat; hulk; tub.
verb (used with object)
4.
to transport by scow.

Origin:
1660–70, Americanism; < Dutch schouw ferryboat

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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
scow (skaʊ)
 
n
1.  an unpowered barge used for freight; lighter
2.  (esp in the midwestern US) a sailing yacht with a flat bottom, designed to plane
 
[C18: via Dutch schouw from Low German schalde, related to Old Saxon skaldan to push (a boat) into the sea]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

scow
"large flat-bottomed boat," 1780, from Du. schouw "a ferry boat, punt," from M.Du. scouwe, related to O.E. scaldan, O.S. scaldan "to push (a boat) from shore."
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
The trouble begins when the husband decides to move the scow to a better location.
Scow founded a plant that produced chrome pigments and iron oxide.
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