site

[sahyt]
noun
1.
the position or location of a town, building, etc., especially as to its environment: the site of our summer cabin.
2.
the area or exact plot of ground on which anything is, has been, or is to be located: the site of ancient Troy.
3.
Computers. website.
verb (used with object), sited, siting.
4.
to place in or provide with a site; locate.
5.
to put in position for operation, as artillery: to site a cannon.

Origin:
1350–1400; Middle English < Latin situs position, arrangement, site (presumably orig. “leaving, setting down”), equivalent to si-, variant stem of sinere to leave, allow to be + -tus suffix of v. action

intersite, adjective
resite, verb (used with object), resited, resiting.

cite, sight, site.


2. position, location, place.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Collins
World English Dictionary
site (saɪt)
 
n
1.  a.  the piece of land where something was, is, or is intended to be located: a building site; archaeological site
 b.  (as modifier): site office
2.  an internet location where information relating to a specific subject or group of subjects can be accessed
 
vb
3.  (tr) to locate, place, or install (something) in a specific place
 
[C14: from Latin situs situation, from sinere to be placed]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

site
"place or position occupied by something," c.1391, from Anglo-Fr. site, from L. situs "place, position," from si-, root of sinere "let, leave alone, permit."
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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American Heritage
Medical Dictionary

site (sīt)
n.
A place; a location. v. sit·ed, sit·ing, sites
To locate or situate at a site.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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Example sentences
On-site admissions programs let applicants know immediately whether they have been accepted.
Here's a hearty seafood stew to cook on-site on a grill or camp stove.
It's heavy, so build the planter in sections that can be screwed together on-site.
The site now houses a sprawling camp of several thousand, with free-food stands
  and a barber doing a busy trade.
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