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tempest

[tem-pist] /ˈtɛm pɪst/
noun
1.
a violent windstorm, especially one with rain, hail, or snow.
2.
a violent commotion, disturbance, or tumult.
verb (used with object)
3.
to affect by or as by a tempest; disturb violently.
Idioms
4.
tempest in a teacup. teacup (def 3).
Origin of tempest
1200-1250
1200-50; Middle English tempeste < Old French < Vulgar Latin *tempesta, for Latin tempestās season, weather, storm, equivalent to tempes- (variant stem of tempus time) + -tās -ty2

Tempest, The

noun
1.
a comedy (1611) by Shakespeare.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2015.
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Examples from the Web for tempest
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • It is like a parting burst of sunshine at the end of a day of tempest.

  • Let us now turn to "The tempest," and see how our poet figures in it.

    The Man Shakespeare Frank Harris
  • A little surcease, then return of the tempest, like return of Polyphemus.

    1492 Mary Johnston
  • This last speech of Slipslop raised a tempest in the mind of her mistress.

    Joseph Andrews, Vol. 2 Henry Fielding
  • The great audience almost leaped to its feet at the sound of that tempest and earthquake.

    T. De Witt Talmage T. De Witt Talmage
British Dictionary definitions for tempest

tempest

/ˈtɛmpɪst/
noun
1.
(mainly literary) a violent wind or storm
2.
a violent commotion, uproar, or disturbance
verb
3.
(transitive) (poetic) to agitate or disturb violently
Word Origin
C13: from Old French tempeste, from Latin tempestās storm, from tempus time
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for tempest
n.

"violent storm," mid-13c., from Old French tempeste (11c.), from Vulgar Latin *tempesta, from Latin tempestas (genitive tempestatis) "storm, weather, season," also "commotion, disturbance," related to tempus "time, season" (see temporal). Sense evolution is from "period of time" to "period of weather," to "bad weather" to "storm." Words for "weather" were originally words for "time" in languages from Russia to Brittany. Figurative sense of "violent commotion" is recorded from early 14c.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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11
13
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