textile

[teks-tahyl, -til]
noun
1.
any cloth or goods produced by weaving, knitting, or felting.
2.
a material, as a fiber or yarn, used in or suitable for weaving: Glass can be used as a textile.
adjective
3.
woven or capable of being woven: textile fabrics.
4.
of or pertaining to weaving.
5.
of or pertaining to textiles or the production of textiles: the textile industry.

Origin:
1520–30; < Latin textilis woven, textile (noun use of neuter) woven fabric, equivalent to text(us), past participle of texere to weave + -ilis, -ile -ile

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World English Dictionary
textile (ˈtɛkstaɪl)
 
n
1.  any fabric or cloth, esp woven
2.  raw material suitable to be made into cloth; fibre or yarn
3.  a non-nudist, as described by nudists; one who wears clothes
 
adj
4.  of or relating to fabrics or the making of fabrics
 
[C17: from Latin textilis woven, from texere to weave]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

textile
1626, from L. textilis "woven, fabric, cloth," noun use of textilis "woven," from texere "to weave," from PIE base *tek- "to make" (see texture).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
Intentional lumps and unevenness and tangled textile fibers give the fabric a
  heathered look with lots of texture.
US textile manufacturers are exploring an innovative way of making clothing,
  furniture upholstery, and other products from corn.
Many were highly skilled machine operators in the textile industry.
Textile and paint manufacturers are looking for eco-friendly ways to create
  brilliant colors.
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