thumping

[thuhm-ping]
adjective
1.
of, like, or pertaining to a thump.
2.
strikingly great, immense, exceptional, or impressive; resounding: a thumping victory at the polls.

Origin:
1570–80; thump + -ing2

thumpingly, adverb
Dictionary.com Unabridged

thump

[thuhmp]
noun
1.
a blow with something thick and heavy, producing a dull sound; a heavy knock.
2.
the sound made by or as if by such a blow.
verb (used with object)
3.
to strike or beat with something thick and heavy, so as to produce a dull sound; pound.
4.
(of an object) to strike against (something) heavily and noisily.
5.
Informal. to thrash severely.
verb (used without object)
6.
to strike, beat, or fall heavily, with a dull sound.
7.
to walk with heavy steps; pound.
8.
to palpitate or beat violently, as the heart.

Origin:
1530–40; imitative

thumper, noun
unthumped, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Collins
World English Dictionary
thump (θʌmp)
 
n
1.  the sound of a heavy solid body hitting or pounding a comparatively soft surface
2.  a heavy blow with the hand: he gave me a thump on the back
 
vb
3.  (tr) to strike or beat heavily; pound
4.  (intr) to throb, beat, or pound violently: his heart thumped with excitement
 
[C16: related to Icelandic, Swedish dialect dumpa to thump; see thud, bump]
 
'thumper
 
n

thumping (ˈθʌmpɪŋ)
 
adj
slang (prenominal) huge or excessive: a thumping loss
 
'thumpingly
 
adv

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Dictionary.com's 21st Century Lexicon
Main Entry:  thumping
Part of Speech:  adj, adv
Definition:  We plan to have a thumping good vacation.
Etymology:  slang
Dictionary.com's 21st Century Lexicon
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

thump
c.1537, "to strike hard," probably imitative of the sound made by hitting with a heavy object (cf. E.Fris. dump "a knock," Swed. dial. dumpa "to make a noise"). The noun is first recorded 1552. Thumping (adj.) "exceptionally large" is colloquial from 1576.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
Rhyme in a thumping rhythm seems to be not merely his trade but his morning
  exercise.
Behind us, the house had become a thumping shadowbox of festivity.
When the villain appeared, there were ominous string tremolos and thumping
  piano themes.
Test for doneness by thumping the cake with a spoon handle or stick.
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