torture

[tawr-cher]
noun
1.
the act of inflicting excruciating pain, as punishment or revenge, as a means of getting a confession or information, or for sheer cruelty.
2.
a method of inflicting such pain.
3.
Often, tortures. the pain or suffering caused or undergone.
4.
extreme anguish of body or mind; agony.
5.
a cause of severe pain or anguish.
verb (used with object), tortured, torturing.
6.
to subject to torture.
7.
to afflict with severe pain of body or mind: My back is torturing me.
8.
to force or extort by torture: We'll torture the truth from his lips!
9.
to twist, force, or bring into some unnatural position or form: trees tortured by storms.
10.
to distort or pervert (language, meaning, etc.).

Origin:
1530–40; < Late Latin tortūra a twisting, torment, torture. See tort, -ure

torturable, adjective
torturedly, adverb
torturer, noun
torturesome, adjective
torturingly, adverb
overtorture, verb (used with object), overtortured, overtorturing.
pretorture, noun, verb (used with object), pretortured, pretorturing.
self-torture, noun
self-tortured, adjective
self-torturing, adjective
untortured, adjective


6. See torment.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
torture (ˈtɔːtʃə)
 
vb
1.  to cause extreme physical pain to, esp in order to extract information, break resistance, etc: to torture prisoners
2.  to give mental anguish to
3.  to twist into a grotesque form
 
n
4.  physical or mental anguish
5.  the practice of torturing a person
6.  a cause of mental agony or worry
 
[C16: from Late Latin tortūra a twisting, from torquēre to twist]
 
usage  The adjective torturous is sometimes confused with tortuous. One speaks of a torturous experience, i.e. one that involves pain or suffering, but of a tortuous road, i.e. one that winds or twists
 
'tortured
 
adj
 
'torturedly
 
adv
 
'torturer
 
n
 
'torturesome
 
adj
 
'torturous
 
adj
 
'torturing
 
adj
 
'torturingly
 
adv
 
'torturously
 
adv

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

torture
c.1495 (implied in torturous), from M.Fr. torture "infliction of great pain, great pain, agony," from L.L. torture "a twisting, writhing, torture, torment," from stem of L. torquere "to twist, turn, wind, wring, distort" (see thwart). The verb is 1588, from the noun. Tortuous
"full of twists" is recorded from 1426.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences for +torture
They beat and torture drusilla so badly that she does not recover for ten years.
Torture was not used as a form of punishment, as was frequent in secular courts.
His coronation, torture, and death are described in the novel.
For others, the word has a pejorative connotation, implying torture and
  suffering.
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