uniformness

uniform

[yoo-nuh-fawrm]
adjective
1.
identical or consistent, as from example to example, place to place, or moment to moment: uniform spelling; a uniform building code.
2.
without variations in detail: uniform output; a uniform surface.
3.
constant; unvarying; undeviating: uniform kindness; uniform velocity.
4.
constituting part of a uniform: to be issued uniform shoes.
5.
Mathematics. occurring in a manner independent of some variable, parameter, function, etc.: a uniform bound.
noun
6.
an identifying outfit or style of dress worn by the members of a given profession, organization, or rank.
7.
a word used in communications to represent the letter U.
verb (used with object)
8.
to make uniform or standard.
9.
to clothe in or furnish with a uniform.

Origin:
1530–40; < Latin ūnifōrmis (adj.), equivalent to ūni- uni- + -fōrmis -form

uniformly, adverb
uniformness, noun
nonuniform, adjective
self-uniform, noun
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
uniform (ˈjuːnɪˌfɔːm)
 
n
1.  a prescribed identifying set of clothes for the members of an organization, such as soldiers or schoolchildren
2.  a single set of such clothes
3.  a characteristic feature or fashion of some class or group
4.  informal a police officer who wears a uniform
 
adj
5.  unchanging in form, quality, quantity, etc; regular: a uniform surface
6.  identical; alike or like: a line of uniform toys
 
vb
7.  to fit out (a body of soldiers, etc) with uniforms
8.  to make uniform
 
[C16: from Latin ūniformis, from ūnus one + forma shape]
 
'uniformly
 
adv
 
'uniformness
 
n

Uniform (ˈjuːnɪˌfɔːm)
 
n
communications a code word for the letter u

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

uniform
1530s, "of one form," from M.Fr. uniforme (14c.), from L. uniformis "having one form," from uni- "one" (see uni-) + forma "form" (see form). The noun meaning "distinctive clothes worn by one group" is first attested 1748, from Fr. uniforme.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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