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Denotation vs. Connotation

vile

[vahyl] /vaɪl/
adjective, viler, vilest.
1.
wretchedly bad:
a vile humor.
2.
highly offensive, unpleasant, or objectionable:
vile slander.
3.
repulsive or disgusting, as to the senses or feelings:
a vile odor.
4.
morally debased, depraved, or despicable:
vile deeds.
5.
foul; filthy:
vile language.
6.
poor; wretched:
vile workmanship.
7.
of mean or low condition:
a vile beggar.
8.
menial; lowly:
vile tasks.
9.
degraded; ignominious:
vile servitude.
10.
of little value or account; paltry:
a vile recompense.
Origin of vile
1250-1300
1250-1300; Middle English vil < Old French < Latin vīlis of little worth, base, cheap
Related forms
vilely, adverb
vileness, noun
Can be confused
vial, vile, viol.
Synonyms
1. See mean2 . 3. repellent. 4. vicious, evil, iniquitous. 5. vulgar, obscene. 9, 10. contemptible. 10. trivial, trifling.
Antonyms
1. good. 4. elevated.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2015.
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Examples from the Web for vileness
Historical Examples
  • It's here in France that one sees what a vileness he has created in the children's and women's lives.

    Out To Win Coningsby Dawson
  • Having been a spy himself,' he was a good judge of the vileness of the office.

    Mistress Wilding Rafael Sabatini
  • The indecent practices of these mediums made it necessary to seek darkness to cover their vileness.

    Is the Devil a Myth? C. F. Wimberly
  • Had you stabbed him in the back with a knife, you would have shown the courage of your vileness.

    Scaramouche Rafael Sabatini
  • The vileness of man in that he submits himself to the brutes, and even worships them.

  • In the very dust I acknowledge those deeds of villany and vileness.

    Eventide Effie Afton
  • Nay, I thank thee that thou hast given my vileness to be the means of his glory.

    Folle-Farine Ouida
  • He'll probably go on to harm me further, for I remind him of his vileness.

    Gulmore, The Boss Frank Harris
  • How quickly the man tears open those eyes that would so willingly be closed to his vileness!

    Six Women Victoria Cross
  • They will rescue him; they will refine the vileness out of him.

    Following the Equator, Complete Mark Twain (Samuel Clemens)
British Dictionary definitions for vileness

vile

/vaɪl/
adjective
1.
abominably wicked; shameful or evil: the vile development of slavery appalled them
2.
morally despicable; ignoble: vile accusations
3.
disgusting to the senses or emotions; foul: a vile smell, vile epithets
4.
tending to humiliate or degrade: only slaves would perform such vile tasks
5.
unpleasant or bad: vile weather
6.
paltry: a vile reward
Derived Forms
vilely, adverb
vileness, noun
Word Origin
C13: from Old French vil, from Latin vīlis cheap
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for vileness

vile

adj.

early 13c. (implied in vilety), from Anglo-French and Old French vile, from Latin vilis "cheap, worthless, base, common," of unknown origin. Related: Vilely.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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11
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