whimsy

[hwim-zee, wim-]
noun, plural whimsies.
1.
capricious humor or disposition; extravagant, fanciful, or excessively playful expression: a play with lots of whimsy.
2.
an odd or fanciful notion.
3.
anything odd or fanciful; a product of playful or capricious fancy: a whimsy from an otherwise thoughtful writer.
Also, whimsey.


Origin:
1595–1605; whim(-wham) + -sy


2. caprice, whim, humor.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Collins
World English Dictionary
whimsy or whimsey (ˈwɪmzɪ)
 
n , pl -sies, -seys
1.  a capricious idea or notion
2.  light or fanciful humour
3.  something quaint or unusual
 
adj , -sies, -seys, -sier, -siest
4.  quaint, comical, or unusual, often in a tasteless way
 
[C17: from whim; compare flimsy]
 
whimsey or whimsey
 
n
 
adj
 
[C17: from whim; compare flimsy]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

whimsy
c.1600, probably related to whimwham.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
Enormous truths can be revealed with a sense of humor and whimsy.
They also permit a degree of whimsy that may seem cloying in a restaurant.
Gaze at the vivid yellows, blues, and psychedelic swirls of a single emperor
  angelfish and you'll sense the whimsy of evolution.
Renovating a patio or a path provides the perfect opportunity to bring a touch
  of whimsy to the garden.
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