gas embolism

gas embolism

noun
1. obstruction of the circulatory system caused by an air bubble as, e.g., accidentally during surgery or hypodermic injection or as a complication from scuba diving [syn: air embolism
2. pain resulting from rapid change in pressure [syn: decompression sickness
WordNet® 3.0, © 2006 by Princeton University.
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Encyclopedia Britannica
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gas embolism

blockage of an artery or vein by an air bubble. Air can be introduced into the blood vessels during surgery or traumatic accidents. One type of traumatic embolization occurs when lung tissue is ruptured; bubbles of air pass from the alveoli (air sacs) of the lungs into nearby capillaries and veins. The air bubbles are then carried into the heart, where, if trapped, they can cause myocardial infarction, the destruction of tissue in the heart muscle; usually, however, the air rises to the brain. The consequent blockage of vessels carrying blood to the brain starves this tissue of its vital blood supply. Nervous tissue becomes irreversibly damaged after about five minutes of oxygen and nutritional starvation; convulsions, unconsciousness, respiratory difficulties, and death may ensue.

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Encyclopedia Britannica, 2008. Encyclopedia Britannica Online.
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