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accuse

[uh-kyooz] /əˈkyuz/
verb (used with object), accused, accusing.
1.
to charge with the fault, offense, or crime (usually followed by of):
He accused him of murder.
2.
to find fault with; blame.
verb (used without object), accused, accusing.
3.
to make an accusation.
Origin
1250-1300
1250-1300; Middle English ac(c)usen < Old French acuser < Latin accūsāre to call to account (ac- ac- + -cūs-, combining form of caus-; see cause)
Related forms
accusable, adjective
accusably, adverb
accusant, noun
accusingly, adverb
interaccuse, verb (used with object), interaccused, interaccusing.
nonaccusing, adjective
preaccuse, verb (used with object), preaccused, preaccusing.
reaccuse, verb (used with object), reaccused, reaccusing.
self-accusing, adjective
unaccusable, adjective
unaccusing, adjective
unaccusingly, adverb
Can be confused
accuse, allege, charge.
Synonyms
1. arraign, indict; incriminate, impeach.
Antonyms
1, 2. exonerate.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples for accuse
  • Many legislators accuse professors of living the cushy life and failing to work productively.
  • They consistently exhibit the intolerance of which they so readily accuse others.
  • But no one could accuse him of being an absentee dad.
  • No one could accuse a seahorse of being a hands-off father.
  • Angry fishermen accuse the cormorant of ruining their livelihood and have taken the law into their own hands.
  • Someone will accuse me of questioning the honesty of veterans.
  • The enemies of the greens-the firms and governments that greens accuse of neglecting nature-ought to watch out.
  • Some critics accuse me of letting wishful thinking cloud my judgment when it comes to these issues.
  • Plus, some old-schoolers couldn't accuse you of being rude.
  • They accuse the department of chronic mismanagement of stocks of wild salmon.
British Dictionary definitions for accuse

accuse

/əˈkjuːz/
verb
1.
to charge (a person or persons) with some fault, offence, crime, etc; impute guilt or blame
Derived Forms
accuser, noun
accusing, adjective
accusingly, adverb
Word Origin
C13: via Old French from Latin accūsāre to call to account, from ad- to + causa lawsuit
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for accuse
v.

c.1300, "charge (with an offense, etc.), impugn, blame," from Old French acuser "to accuse, indict, reproach, blame" (13c.), earlier "announce, report, disclose" (12c.), or directly from Latin accusare "to call to account," from ad- "against" (see ad-) + causari "give as a cause or motive," from causa "reason" (see cause (n.)). Related: Accused; accusing; accusingly.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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