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allocation

[al-uh-key-shuh n] /ˌæl əˈkeɪ ʃən/
noun
1.
the act of allocating; apportionment.
2.
the state of being allocated.
3.
the share or portion allocated.
4.
Accounting. a system of dividing expenses and incomes among the various branches, departments, etc., of a business.
Origin
1525-1535
1525-35; < Medieval Latin allocātiōn- (stem of allocātiō), equivalent to allocāt(us) (see allocate) + -iōn- -ion
Related forms
allocative, adjective
deallocation, noun
reallocation, noun
suballocation, noun
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for allocations
  • allocations are always shifting as needs change and communications technology advances.
  • There are a mind-numbing number of spectrum allocations, ranging from military communications to astronomical research.
  • However, as one poster noted, the internal cost allocations are different.
  • With wise allocations, investments can grow exponentially.
  • It also means that measurable outcomes need to be established so that resource allocations can be justified.
  • Compare your space allocations within and among departments, colleges, across your campus.
  • There is no self-evident principle by which one allocation of rights may be privileged over other allocations.
  • It may reflect arbitrary accounting allocations after the event.
  • Fifth, it aims to base its allocations on good performance, using indicators for governance and economic management.
  • Some of those allocations will do about as much to stimulate the economy as a pair of jumper cables.
British Dictionary definitions for allocations

allocation

/ˌæləˈkeɪʃən/
noun
1.
the act of allocating or the state of being allocated
2.
a part that is allocated; share
3.
(accounting, Brit) a system of dividing overhead expenses between the various departments of a business
4.
(social welfare) (in a Social Services Department) the process of assigning referrals to individual workers, thus changing their status to cases
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for allocations

allocation

n.

mid-15c., from Middle French allocacion, from Medieval Latin allocationem (nominative allocatio), noun of action from past participle stem of allocare (see allocate).

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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