antinomy

[an-tin-uh-mee]
noun, plural antinomies.
1.
opposition between one law, principle, rule, etc., and another.
2.
Philosophy. a contradiction between two statements, both apparently obtained by correct reasoning.

Origin:
1585–95; < Latin antinomia < Greek antinomía a contradiction between laws. See anti-, -nomy

antinomic [an-ti-nom-ik] , antinomical, adjective
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World English Dictionary
antinomy (ænˈtɪnəmɪ)
 
n , pl -mies
1.  opposition of one law, principle, or rule to another; contradiction within a law
2.  philosophy contradiction existing between two apparently indubitable propositions; paradox
 
[C16: from Latin antinomia, from Greek: conflict between laws, from anti- + nomos law]
 
antinomic
 
adj
 
anti'nomically
 
adv

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

antinomy
1590s, "contradiction in the laws," from L. antinomia, from Gk. antinomia "ambiguity in the law," from anti- "against" + nomos "law" (see numismatics). As a term in logic, from 1802 (Kant).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
There is more to this antagonistic structure of argument than the simple antinomies of partisan politics.
As a result, teachers prefer to talk about the value of abstract tolerance rather than about its practical limits and antinomies.
Antinomies are conflicting statements both of which appear to be validated by reason.
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