blindside

[blahynd-sahyd]
verb (used with object), blindsided, blindsiding.
1.
Sports. to tackle, hit, or attack (an opponent) from the blind side: The quarterback was blindsided and had the ball knocked out of his hand.
2.
Informal. to attack critically where a person is vulnerable, uninformed, etc.: The president was blindsided by the press on the latest tax bill.

Origin:
1970–75; v. use of noun phrase blind side

Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

blindside
also blind-side, blind side; the last, with the meaning "unguarded aspect," is from c.1600; the verb meaning "to hit from the blind side" (written as one word) first attested 1968, Amer.Eng., in ref. to U.S. football.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
Your board was blindsided by tentative approaches to merge with another bank.
Given how the administration has been repeatedly blindsided by events, the
  answer is likely a no.
Although prepared for the less-virulent kennel cough, boarding sites have been
  blindsided by the new virus.
Rider says he was blindsided by the league's decision to suspend him for two
  games for past off-court transgressions.
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