Bunsen burner

Bunsen burner

noun
a type of gas burner, commonly used in chemical laboratories, with which a very hot, practically nonluminous flame is obtained by allowing air to enter at the base and mix with the gas.

Origin:
1865–70; named after R. W. Bunsen

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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Collins
World English Dictionary
Bunsen burner (ˈbʌnsən)
 
n
a gas burner, widely used in scientific laboratories, consisting of a metal tube with an adjustable air valve at the base
 
[C19: named after R. W. Bunsen]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

Bunsen burner
1879, named for Prof. Robert Wilhelm Bunsen (1811-1899) of Heidelberg, who invented it in 1855. He also was co-inventor of the spectroscope.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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American Heritage
Medical Dictionary

Bunsen burner Bun·sen burner (bŭn'sən)
n.
A small laboratory burner consisting of a vertical metal tube connected to a gas source and producing a very hot flame from a mixture of gas and air let in through adjustable holes at the base.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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American Heritage
Science Dictionary
Bunsen burner  
A small gas burner used in laboratories. It consists of a vertical metal tube connected to a gas fuel source, with adjustable holes at its base. These holes allow air to enter the tube and mix with the gas in order to make a very hot flame.
The American Heritage® Science Dictionary
Copyright © 2002. Published by Houghton Mifflin. All rights reserved.
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Encyclopedia Britannica
Encyclopedia

bunsen burner

device for combining a flammable gas with controlled amounts of air before ignition; it produces a hotter flame than would be possible using the ambient air and gas alone. Named for Robert Bunsen, the German chemist who introduced it in 1855 (from a design by Peter Desdega or Michael Faraday), the Bunsen burner was the forerunner of the gas-stove burner and the gas furnace. The Bunsen burner consists of a metal tube on a base with a gas inlet at the lower end of the tube, which may have an adjusting valve; openings in the sides of the tube can be regulated by a collar to admit as much air as desired. The mixture of air and gas (optimally about 1 part gas to 3 parts air) is forced by gas pressure to the top of the tube, where it is ignited with a match. It burns with a pale blue flame, the primary flame, seen as a small inner cone, and a secondary, almost colourless flame, seen as a larger, outer cone, which results when the remaining gas is completely oxidized by the surrounding air

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Encyclopedia Britannica, 2008. Encyclopedia Britannica Online.
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