buoyance

buoyancy

[boi-uhn-see, boo-yuhn-see]
noun
1.
the power to float or rise in a fluid; relative lightness.
2.
the power of supporting a body so that it floats; upward pressure exerted by the fluid in which a body is immersed.
3.
lightness or resilience of spirit; cheerfulness.
Also, buoyance.


Origin:
1705–15; buoy(ant) + -ancy

nonbuoyancy, noun
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
buoyancy (ˈbɔɪənsɪ)
 
n
1.  the ability to float in a liquid or to rise in a fluid
2.  the property of a fluid to exert an upward force (upthrust) on a body that is wholly or partly submerged in it
3.  the ability to recover quickly after setbacks; resilience
4.  cheerfulness

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

buoyance
1821, from buoy + -ance.

buoyancy
1713, from buoyant + -cy. Figurative sense (of spirits, etc.) is from 1819.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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American Heritage
Science Dictionary
buoyancy   (boi'ən-sē)  Pronunciation Key 
The upward force that a fluid exerts on an object that is less dense than itself. Buoyancy allows a boat to float on water and provides lift for balloons.
The American Heritage® Science Dictionary
Copyright © 2002. Published by Houghton Mifflin. All rights reserved.
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American Heritage
Cultural Dictionary

buoyancy definition


The force that causes objects to float. According to the principle of Archimedes, when a solid is placed in a fluid (a liquid or a gas), it is subject to an upward force equal in magnitude to the weight of the fluid it has displaced.

The American Heritage® New Dictionary of Cultural Literacy, Third Edition
Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Company.
Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
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Synonyms
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