carbohydrate

[kahr-boh-hahy-dreyt, -buh-]
noun
any of a class of organic compounds that are polyhydroxy aldehydes or polyhydroxy ketones, or change to such substances on simple chemical transformations, as hydrolysis, oxidation, or reduction, and that form the supporting tissues of plants and are important food for animals and people.

Origin:
1865–70; carbo- + hydrate

noncarbohydrate, noun
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World English Dictionary
carbohydrate (ˌkɑːbəʊˈhaɪdreɪt)
 
n
Informal term: carb any of a large group of organic compounds, including sugars, such as sucrose, and polysaccharides, such as cellulose, glycogen, and starch, that contain carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen, with the general formula Cm(H2O)n: an important source of food and energy for animals

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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

carbohydrate
1869, from carbo- "carbon" + hydrate, denoting compound produced when certain substances combine with water.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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American Heritage
Medical Dictionary

carbohydrate car·bo·hy·drate (kär'bō-hī'drāt')
n.
Any of a group of organic compounds that includes sugars, starches, celluloses, and gums and serves as a major energy source in the diet of animals; they are produced by photosynthetic plants and contain only carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen, usually in the ratio 1:2:1.

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American Heritage
Science Dictionary
carbohydrate   (kär'bō-hī'drāt')  Pronunciation Key 
Any of a large class of organic compounds consisting of carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen, usually with twice as many hydrogen atoms as carbon or oxygen atoms. Carbohydrates are produced in green plants by photosynthesis and serve as a major energy source in animal diets. Sugars, starches, and cellulose are all carbohydrates.
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American Heritage
Cultural Dictionary

carbohydrates definition


Substances composed of long chains of oxygen, hydrogen, and carbon molecules. Sugar, starch, and cellulose are all carbohydrates. In the human body, carbohydrates play a major role in respiration; in plants, they are important in photosynthesis.

Note: Carbohydrates in food provide energy for the body and, if present in excess, are stored as fat.
The American Heritage® New Dictionary of Cultural Literacy, Third Edition
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Example sentences
Carbohydrates are one of the main dietary components.
To give up all carbohydrates or all proteins was, he believed, both ridiculous
  and dangerous.
The complex carbohydrates are called polysaccharides.
Diets high in sugar or other carbohydrates and allergenic foods increase the
  inflammatory conditions.
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