catafalque

[kat-uh-fawk, -fawlk, -falk]
noun
1.
a raised structure on which the body of a deceased person lies or is carried in state.
2.
a hearse.

Origin:
1635–45; < French < Italian catafalco < Late Latin *catafalicum scaffold, equivalent to cata- cata- + fal(a) wooden siege tower + -icum, neuter of -icus -ic

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World English Dictionary
catafalque (ˈkætəˌfælk)
 
n
a temporary raised platform on which a body lies in state before or during a funeral
 
[C17: from French, from Italian catafalco, of uncertain origin; compare scaffold]

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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

catafalque
1641, from Fr. catafalque, from It. catafalco "scaffold," from V.L. *catafalicum, from Gk. kata- "down," used in M.L. with a sense of "beside, alongside" + fala "scaffolding."
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Encyclopedia Britannica
Encyclopedia

catafalque

ornate, often theatrical, usually movable funereal structure mounted on a stage to support a coffin for a lying-in-state. It is used for royalty and personages of distinction and is normally set up in a historic public hall, such as Westminster Hall, London, and the Capitol Rotunda in Washington, D.C. The reputation of the Spanish architect Jose Churriguera, known for his exuberant and fantastic Baroque style, was established overnight in 1689 by his design for the catafalque for Queen Maria Louisa, first wife of Charles II. Certain European shrines of saints in which the body is visible are sometimes regarded as catafalques.

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Encyclopedia Britannica, 2008. Encyclopedia Britannica Online.
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Example sentences
The catafalque in the cathedral is net yet ready, and se the body will net be moved there till te mor row.
Synonyms
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