Celeste

Collins
World English Dictionary
celesta or celeste (sɪˈlɛstə, sɪˈlɛst)
 
n
music a keyboard percussion instrument consisting of a set of steel plates of graduated length that are struck with key-operated hammers. The tone is an ethereal tinkling sound. Range: four octaves upwards from middle C
 
[C19: from French, Latinized variant of céleste heavenly]
 
celeste or celeste
 
n
 
[C19: from French, Latinized variant of céleste heavenly]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

Celeste
fem. proper name, from Fr. céleste (11c.) "sky, heaven," from L. cælestus, from cælum "heaven" (see celestial).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Encyclopedia Britannica
Encyclopedia

celeste

orchestral percussion instrument resembling a small upright piano, patented by a Parisian, Auguste Mustel, in 1886. It consists of a series of small metal bars (and hence is a metallophone) with a keyboard and a simplified piano action in which small felt hammers strike the bars. Each bar is resonated by a wooden box or similar chamber tuned to reinforce the fundamental harmonic (component tone) of the bar. A pedal lifts a felt-pad damper from the bars, permitting use of either sustained or short notes. The normal range is four octaves upward from middle C

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Encyclopedia Britannica, 2008. Encyclopedia Britannica Online.
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