chink

1 [chingk]

Origin:
1350–1400; Middle English; perhaps chine1 + -k suffix (see -ock)


1. breach, rent, cut.
Dictionary.com Unabridged

chink

2 [chingk]
verb (used with object), verb (used without object)
1.
to make, or cause to make, a short, sharp, ringing sound, as of coins or glasses striking together.
noun
2.
a chinking sound: the chink of ice in a glass.
3.
Slang. coin or ready cash.

Origin:
1565–75; imitative

Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
chink1 (tʃɪŋk)
 
n
1.  a small narrow opening, such as a fissure or crack
2.  chink in one's armour a small but fatal weakness
 
vb
3.  chiefly (US), (Canadian) (tr) to fill up or make cracks in
 
[C16: perhaps variant of earlier chine, from Old English cine crack; related to Middle Dutch kene, Danish kin]
 
'chinky1
 
adj

chink2 (tʃɪŋk)
 
vb
1.  to make or cause to make a light ringing sound, as by the striking of glasses or coins
 
n
2.  such a sound
 
[C16: of imitative origin]

Chink or taboo Chinky (tʃɪŋk, ˈtʃɪŋkɪ)
 
n, —adj , pl Chinks, Chinkies
an old-fashioned and highly derogatory term for Chinese
 
[C20: probably from Chinese, influenced by chink1 (referring to the characteristic shape of the Chinese eye)]
 
Chinky or taboo Chinky
 
n, —adj
 
[C20: probably from Chinese, influenced by chink1 (referring to the characteristic shape of the Chinese eye)]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

chink
"slit," 1530s, from M.E. chine (with parasitic -k) from O.E. cinu "fissure," related to cinan "to crack, split, gape," from PIE base *gei-, *gi- "to germinate, bloom," connection being in the notion of bursting open.

chink
"a Chinaman," 1901, derogatory, perhaps derived somehow from China, or else from chink (1) with ref. to eye shape.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
Tiny pieces of stone called chinking are also embedded in the mortar, to strengthen construction.
Sufficient hand placing and chinking shall be done to provide tightly interlocked surface.
Bearing on smaller rocks which may be used for chinking voids will not be acceptable.
The craftsmanship of the cabin shows in the hand-sawn planks, and split log
  chinking.
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