cloak

[klohk]
noun
1.
a loose outer garment, as a cape or coat.
2.
something that covers or conceals; disguise; pretense: He conducts his affairs under a cloak of secrecy.
verb (used with object)
3.
to cover with or as if with a cloak: She arrived at the opera cloaked in green velvet.
4.
to hide; conceal: The mission was cloaked in mystery.

Origin:
1175–1225; Middle English cloke (< Old French) < Medieval Latin cloca, variant of clocca bell-shaped cape, bell; see clock1

cloakless, adjective
undercloak, noun
well-cloaked, adjective


2. cover, mask, veil.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
Cite This Source Link To Cloaked
Collins
World English Dictionary
cloak (kləʊk)
 
n
1.  a wraplike outer garment fastened at the throat and falling straight from the shoulders
2.  something that covers or conceals
 
vb
3.  to cover with or as if with a cloak
4.  to hide or disguise
 
[C13: from Old French cloque, from Medieval Latin clocca cloak, bell; referring to the bell-like shape]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
Cite This Source
Etymonline
Word Origin & History

cloak
1293, from O.N.Fr. cloque, from M.L. clocca "travelers' cape," lit. "a bell," so called from the garment's bell-like appearance (see bell). The verb is from 1509. Cloak and dagger (1806) translates Fr. de cape et d'épée. Cloakroom is from 1852.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
Cite This Source
Easton
Bible Dictionary

Cloak definition


an upper garment, "an exterior tunic, wide and long, reaching to the ankles, but without sleeves" (Isa. 59:17). The word so rendered is elsewhere rendered "robe" or "mantle." It was worn by the high priest under the ephod (Ex. 28:31), by kings and others of rank (1 Sam. 15:27; Job 1:20; 2:12), and by women (2 Sam. 13:18). The word translated "cloke", i.e., outer garment, in Matt. 5:40 is in its plural form used of garments in general (Matt. 17:2; 26:65). The cloak mentioned here and in Luke 6:29 was the Greek himation, Latin pallium, and consisted of a large square piece of wollen cloth fastened round the shoulders, like the abba of the Arabs. This could be taken by a creditor (Ex. 22:26,27), but the coat or tunic (Gr. chiton) mentioned in Matt. 5:40 could not. The cloak which Paul "left at Troas" (2 Tim. 4:13) was the Roman paenula, a thick upper garment used chiefly in travelling as a protection from the weather. Some, however, have supposed that what Paul meant was a travelling-bag. In the Syriac version the word used means a bookcase. (See Dress.)

Easton's 1897 Bible Dictionary
Cite This Source
Example sentences
Views of the valley floor reveal a desert cloaked in green.
It is the nun among our wild flowers,-a form closely veiled and cloaked.
In the morning mist, the mountains appear almost tropically lush, their buttes
  and crags cloaked in green.
When the event was cloaked, however, the telltale spike was basically
  undetectable.
Related Words
Copyright © 2014 Dictionary.com, LLC. All rights reserved.
  • Please Login or Sign Up to use the Recent Searches feature