collocation

[kol-uh-key-shuhn]
noun
1.
the act of collocating.
2.
the state or manner of being collocated.
3.
the arrangement, especially of words in a sentence.
4.
Linguistics. a co-occurrence of lexical items, as perform with operation or commit with crime.

Origin:
1595–1605; < Latin collocātiōn- (stem of collocātiō), equivalent to collocāt(us) (see collocate) + -iōn- -ion

collocational, collocative, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Collins
World English Dictionary
collocation (ˌkɒləˈkeɪʃən)
 
n
a grouping together of things in a certain order, as of the words in a sentence

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

collocation
early 17c., from L. collocationem, noun of action from collocare (see collocate). Linguistics sense is attested from 1940.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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FOLDOC
Computing Dictionary

collocation definition


co-location

The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing, © Denis Howe 2010 http://foldoc.org
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Example sentences
Scientific biography was interested in facts as such, in the collocation of
  miscellaneous information about persons.
The collocation fall guy has been much in the news lately.
Collocation is the collection, or grouping, of transmitters for different
  communications services at a single site.
At the hearing, numerous questions arose involving collocation.
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