concussive

concussion

[kuhn-kuhsh-uhn]
noun
1.
Pathology. injury to the brain or spinal cord due to jarring from a blow, fall, or the like.
2.
shock caused by the impact of a collision, blow, etc.
3.
the act of violently shaking or jarring.

Origin:
1350–1400; Middle English < Latin concussiōn- (stem of concussiō) a shaking. See concuss, -ion

concussional, concussant [kuhn-kuhs-uhnt] , adjective
concussive, adjective
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World English Dictionary
concussion (kənˈkʌʃən)
 
n
1.  a jarring of the brain, caused by a blow or a fall, usually resulting in loss of consciousness
2.  any violent shaking; jarring
 
con'cussive
 
adj

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

concussion
1490, from L. concussionem (nom. concussio), pp. of concutere "shake violently," from com- "together" + quatere "to shake." Modern brain injury sense is from 1540s.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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American Heritage
Medical Dictionary

concussion con·cus·sion (kən-kŭsh'ən)
n.

  1. A violent shaking or jarring.

  2. An injury to a soft structure, especially the brain, produced by a violent blow and followed by a temporary or prolonged loss of function.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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American Heritage
Science Dictionary
concussion   (kən-kŭsh'ən)  Pronunciation Key 
An injury to a soft structure, especially the brain, produced by a violent blow or impact and followed by a temporary, sometimes prolonged, loss of function. A concussion of the brain results in transient loss of consciousness or memory.
The American Heritage® Science Dictionary
Copyright © 2002. Published by Houghton Mifflin. All rights reserved.
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