coracle

coracle

[kawr-uh-kuhl, kor-]
noun
a small, round, or very broad boat made of wickerwork or interwoven laths covered with a waterproof layer of animal skin, canvas, tarred or oiled cloth, or the like: used in Wales, Ireland, and parts of western England.

Origin:
1540–50; < Welsh corwgl, corwg; akin to Irish curach boat; see currach

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Collins
World English Dictionary
coracle (ˈkɒrəkəl)
 
n
a small roundish boat made of waterproofed hides stretched over a wicker frame
 
[C16: from Welsh corwgl; related to Irish curach boat]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

coracle
1540s (the thing is described, but not named, in the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle from 9c.), from Welsh corwgl, from corwg, cognate with Irish curach "boat."
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Encyclopedia Britannica
Encyclopedia

coracle

primitive, light, bowl-shaped boat with a frame of woven grasses, reeds, or saplings covered with hides. Those still used, in Wales and on the coasts of Ireland, usually have a canvas and tar covering. American Indians used the similar bullboat, covered with buffalo hides, on the Missouri River, and the corita, often sealed with bitumen, on the Colorado

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Encyclopedia Britannica, 2008. Encyclopedia Britannica Online.
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