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crevice

[krev-is] /ˈkrɛv ɪs/
noun
1.
a crack forming an opening; cleft; rift; fissure.
Origin
1300-1350
1300-50; Middle English crevace < Anglo-French, Old French, equivalent to crev(er) to crack (< Latin crepāre) + -ace noun suffix
Related forms
creviced, adjective
Can be confused
crevice, crevasse.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for crevices
  • Proto-snakes might have burrowed underground searching for food in small crevices.
  • They hide in crevices and are resilient to many insecticides.
  • Bed bugs who have not had the meals are smaller and difficult to track below folds and crevices.
  • When the water dried up, wind eroded away the sediments, leaving behind the deep crevices and some layers of sedimentary rocks.
  • Listeria do tend to lurk in wet crevices of packing plants.
  • Most of those hosts tuck in the partner cells whole in crevices or pockets among host cells.
  • The steep crevices and canyons between the hoodoos capture water, which erodes the landscape further.
  • Lichens and mosses can squeeze into cracks and crevices, where they take root.
  • The researchers also discovered quartz flakes packed in some of the cave's crevices.
  • And their soft bodies can squeeze into impossibly small cracks and crevices where predators can't follow.
British Dictionary definitions for crevices

crevice

/ˈkrɛvɪs/
noun
1.
a narrow fissure or crack; split; cleft
Word Origin
C14: from Old French crevace, from crever to burst, from Latin crepāre to crack
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for crevices

crevice

n.

mid-14c., from Old French crevace (12c., Modern French crevasse) "gap, rift, crack" (also, vulgarly, "the female pudenda"), from Vulgar Latin *crepacia, from Latin crepare "to crack, creak;" meaning shifted from the sound of breaking to the resulting fissure.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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crevices in Medicine

crevice crev·ice (krěv'ĭs)
n.
A narrow crack, fissure, or cleft.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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