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crock1

[krok] /krɒk/
noun
1.
an earthenware pot, jar, or other container.
2.
a fragment of earthenware; potsherd.
Origin
1000
before 1000; Middle English crokke, Old English croc(c), crocca pot; cognate with Old Norse krukka jug

crock2

[krok] /krɒk/
noun
1.
a person or thing that is old, decrepit, or broken-down.
2.
Slang. a person who complains about or insists on being treated for an imagined illness.
3.
an old ewe.
4.
an old worn-out horse.
verb (used with object)
5.
British Slang. to disable or injure.
Origin
1300-50; Middle English crok old ewe, perhaps akin to crack (v.) and obsolete crack whore; compare Low German krakke broken-down horse

crock3

[krok] /krɒk/
noun
1.
British Dialect. soot; smut.
2.
excess surface dye from imperfectly dyed cloth.
verb (used with object)
3.
British Dialect. to soil with soot.
verb (used without object)
4.
(of cloth) to give off excess surface dye when rubbed.
Origin
1650-60; origin uncertain

crock4

[krok] /krɒk/
noun, Slang.
1.
a lie; exaggeration; nonsense:
The entire story is just a crock.
Origin
orig. unclear, though often taken as a euphemism for a crock of shit
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples for crock
  • So not only does this utility greatly benefit from solar power but now want to fine them is a crock.
  • To say that solar is a bad idea because it reflects energy is a crock.
  • The valuations for these social networking sites are all a crock.
  • Bring along a crock pot if you are traveling by car.
  • Chiropractic manipulation is a crock, they might as well put up signs that say witch doctor.
  • That's a crock and any engineer worth their salt knows it.
  • However, catastrophic climate change is a bunch of crock though.
  • Thus it really is an intelligent idea, though of course, it's a bunch of crock.
  • Pack it in a crock and set it out on the coffee table with toasts or crackers.
  • Add the stock to the meat, sprinkle in bay leaves and marjoram, set away in the low crock to cool.
British Dictionary definitions for crock

crock1

/krɒk/
noun
1.
an earthen pot, jar, etc
2.
a piece of broken earthenware
3.
(US & Canadian, informal) Also crock of shit. a quantity or source of lies or nonsense
Word Origin
Old English crocc pot; related to Old Norse krukka jug, Middle Low German krūke pot

crock2

/krɒk/
noun
1.
(slang, mainly Brit) a person or thing, such as a car, that is old or decrepit (esp in the phrase old crock)
2.
an old broken-down horse or ewe
verb
3.
(slang, mainly Brit) to become or cause to become weak or disabled
Word Origin
C15: originally Scottish; related to Norwegian krake unhealthy animal, Dutch kraak decrepit person or animal

crock3

/krɒk/
noun
1.
(dialect, mainly Brit) soot or smut
2.
colour that rubs off fabric
verb
3.
(transitive) (dialect, mainly Brit) to soil with or as if with soot
4.
(intransitive) (of a dyed fabric) to release colour when rubbed, as a result of imperfect dyeing
Word Origin
C17: probably from crock1
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for crock
crock
O.E. crocc, crocca "pot," from P.Gmc. *krogu "pitcher, pot." Used as an image of worthless rubbish since 19c., perhaps from the use of crockery as chamberpots.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Slang definitions & phrases for crock

crock

noun
  1. A disliked person, esp an old person: a lot of old crocks with baggy eyes (1876+)
  2. A hypochondriac and whining patient (1950s+ Medical)
  3. A bargelike cargo ship made of cement (WWII Navy)
  4. crock of shit: Spook the sponsors. What a crock/ Bonny Loo giggles, ''That's a crock''
  5. Something, esp a program, that functions, but in an ugly or awkward manner (1980s+ Computer)
verb
  1. To hit; clobber, clock: I crocked the orderly with a bedspring (1918+)
  2. To ruin; wreck; kill; queer: Calling the pitch lies, as you might imagine, crocked the job (1918+)

The Dictionary of American Slang, Fourth Edition by Barbara Ann Kipfer, PhD. and Robert L. Chapman, Ph.D.
Copyright (C) 2007 by HarperCollins Publishers.
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crock in Technology

[American scatologism "crock of shit"] 1. An awkward feature or programming technique that ought to be made cleaner. For example, using small integers to represent error codes without the program interpreting them to the user (as in, for example, Unix "make(1)", which returns code 139 for a process that dies due to segfault).
2. A technique that works acceptably, but which is quite prone to failure if disturbed in the least. For example, a too-clever programmer might write an assembler which mapped instruction mnemonics to numeric opcodes algorithmically, a trick which depends far too intimately on the particular bit patterns of the opcodes. (For another example of programming with a dependence on actual opcode values, see The Story of Mel.) Many crocks have a tightly woven, almost completely unmodifiable structure. See kluge, brittle. The adjectives "crockish" and "crocky", and the nouns "crockishness" and "crockitude", are also used.
[Jargon File]
The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing, © Denis Howe 2010 http://foldoc.org
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13
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