drool

[drool]
verb (used without object)
1.
to water at the mouth, as in anticipation of food; salivate; drivel.
2.
to show excessive pleasure or anticipation of pleasure.
3.
to talk foolishly.
noun
4.
saliva running down from one's mouth; drivel.

Origin:
1795–1805; variant of driule, itself variant of drivel

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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Collins
World English Dictionary
drool (druːl)
 
vb (often foll by over)
1.  to show excessive enthusiasm (for) or pleasure (in); gloat (over)
 
vb, —n
2.  drivel drivel another word for drivel
 
[C19: probably alteration of drivel]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

drool
1802, apparently dial. variant or contraction of drivel. Related: Drooled; drooling.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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FOLDOC
Computing Dictionary

DROOL definition

games
Dave's Recycled Object-Oriented Language. Language for writing adventure games. An updated implementation of AdvSys. multiple inheritance, garbage collection.
["Dave's Recycled OO Language", David Betz, Dr. Dobbs J, Oct 1993, pp.74-78].

The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing, © Denis Howe 2010 http://foldoc.org
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Example sentences
Most of it comes from people whose shirt fronts are practically drenched in
  drool.
Universities all over the country would fight and drool over him.
These shifting ideas have in turn influenced policy, and to a degree that would
  make other social scientists drool.
Waves were so large they would have made any surfing champion drool.
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